Tag Archives: therapy

Physical And Mental Healing Is Vital After Trauma

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Dealing with trauma can take months to recover from. Not only is it difficult mentally, but the physical aspects can be debilitating. Each case must be dealt with individually. Every person has different needs. No matter the injury or illness, you must have the help you need and the support you desire. Thankfully, both are available to you. Physical healing comes in different forms. There are many types of therapy, such as occupational therapy and physical therapy, and in this instance, you must know the difference between the two. Once you have established this, you can learn which is the best route for you.

I can’t shake off my anxiety

PTSD is very common after an injury or accident. It may take time to revert to your former self and lifestyle. However, you must be patient with yourself. Anxiety and depression can easily spiral out of control. It may lead to a feeling of isolation. If you feel as if you don’t want to leave the house or you are unable to get back in your car, don’t force the matter. If your anxiety is connected to the fear of the event repeating itself, you must take time to do things slowly. If your anxiety is connected to the fear of being unable to control in an environment that is beyond your control (such as a supermarket or shopping mall), then take it slowly. Visit quieter places first, such as the local park or a quiet coffee shop.

Driving anxiety

Driving anxiety can cause people to avoid driving for a long time. Some are apprehensive about driving even if their accident had nothing to do with an automobile. They may simply feel that they can’t get behind a wheel again, which could lead to further insecurities. Road accidents have physical and mental effects. Signs of anxiety may appear a few days after a car accident, or even longer. They may manifest as: nightmares, troublesome thoughts, panic attacks and physical anxiety. 

Dealing with the problem effectively 

Remember, self care is vital. It is important to undergo treatment for accident induced anxiety as early as possible. There are a number of effective treatments, one of which is cognitive therapy. This deals with the mental aspect of PTSD. Through focused and effective treatment, the patient can learn to deal with the signs of distress. They can deal with the trauma they went through. Treatment focuses on rebuilding the patient’s thoughts following the traumatic event and suffering. Changing our thoughts gives us a new perspective, which is often the most important element for healing. A road to nowhere feels lonely and isolating. Having no direction leads us to feel insecure in life and without purpose. You may feel a fear that life won’t return to normal, or that there is no escape from your current thoughts.

When does fear become anxiety?

Fear and anxiety are two emotions that are on the same axis. However, there are some differences between the two. First, fear is the body’s alarm response in the face of imminent danger. Anxiety or any panic attack involves fear of future danger and usually excessive, unrealistic or intangible danger. It can significantly impair the quality of life of its sufferers. That is why many people dealing with PTSD related anxiety should seek attention sooner rather than later. Suffering in silence is counterproductive and hinders your recovery. After all, your mental state is closely connected to your physical being. Anxiety can affect your digestive system, as well as cause headaches, dizziness, low blood pressure and poor sleep. 

Patience is a key word in achieving your goal, but it is important to emphasize that the journey to get there may be bumpy. You must remember that healing from physical injury takes time. Mental challenges only add to this difficulty. Therefore, realize that it is a gradual process that may take many months if not years. This is one of the reasons why it is recommended not to linger, but to start any treatments or therapies as soon as possible.

Guest Post: The Truth About Therapy

Just the other day, one of my students asked me why I, a seemingly well adjusted adult who is the leader of her classroom, would ever go to therapy. She said the word with disdain – therapy– as if it was something to be ashamed of or embarrassed about. I chuckled, wondering just how much time I had to enlighten her on all the reasons why I do need it, and why I have been going to a therapist since college.

I’m an open book, someone who is not afraid to share her story or struggles with the general public, but I was not always that way. When I first started treatment for my eating disorder back in 2013, I was terrified about letting the world know that was what I was doing. I covered up my move to New York as a career move (I’m in the arts so it wasn’t a stretch), but the longer I was in treatment and the more I opened up to my therapist, the more I knew I needed to open up to the rest of the world. I needed the walls to come down, and little by little, they did. Now, I can’t imagine my life without being someone who shares what she went through with anyone who asks.

Because I am the passionate, go-getter individual that I am, when I started recovery I set a very high goal for myself. I remember saying the words out loud to my therapist. “I am going to love my whole self, 100% of the time.” She laughed at me. She literally laughed, and said, “that’s an impossible goal, Katie. I’m not letting you set that.” I was angry at her for doubting me. Hey, you barely even know me!! You don’t know what I’m capable of! But it’s true…I would be disappointed every single day when I woke up and looked at myself in the mirror and didn’t fall in love with the broken, changing girl in front of me. She was trying so hard. She also believed that therapy was something that you accomplished, and then you were done. Much like how I viewed recovery when I first began the process. I would quickly learn that, like almost everything else in recovery, it was not that simple.

To an untrained eye, I am recovered. I eat normally, I have restored my weight, I don’t have panic attacks daily, and I’m not a slave to my compulsions like I used to be. But I know that recovery is a lifelong venture that doesn’t end just because you aren’t in treatment anymore. Because of the nature of this ongoing journey, I firmly hope that I am always in therapy. It’s a safe space – a place that taught me how to be open to trying new things, how to speak authentically, and what empathy really means. Most importantly it showed me how to begin a conversation about mental health with anyone who asks, including my students.


Katie Berger is a musician, performer, and teaching artist based in St. Petersburg, FL. She is the writer and composer of Full the Musical, which details one girl’s battle with her eating disorder and struggles with childhood trauma. She began treatment for anorexia in 2013 and is so grateful to her treatment team and the people who supported her through the worst of her illness. She is a mental health advocate and an ear for anyone who might need one.

This guest post was inspired by BetterHelp, a website that makes professional counseling accessible so anyone can get help – anytime, anywhere. If you’re interested in learning more about online therapy , CLICK HERE.

Guest Post: Is Online Therapy for You?

I always seem to find out about the newest life-changing products and services through sponsored ads on podcasts. And my interest is inevitably piqued. (I guess they really know their demographics!) From clothing rental services to period panties to audio books, they’re always telling me about something I’ve gotta try. In my experience, they’re usually right! But lately, a new set of ads has been cropping up — for online therapy. Intrigued, I thought I’d ask Marie Miguel, a resource creator for Better Help, a few of my most pressing questions…

Is Online Therapy for You?

No matter who you are or what you do, chances are pretty good that you have experienced anxiety or depression at one time or another. Some of us more so than others. In fact, depression is the most common reason for disability in America and anxiety disorders are the most common mental health condition in the United States. The worst part of this is that many people with a mental health disorder will not get treatment. In fact, almost 40% of people with mental health conditions do not reach out for help. That is most unfortunate because both depression and anxiety disorders are treatable with therapy and/or medication. One of the most common excuses is that they do not have time. Well, with online therapy you will have time because you can do it anytime. And that is only one of the benefits of online therapy. Here are some others:

Who Can Benefit from Online Therapy?

Anyone can benefit from online therapy. Whether you have some type of anxiety disorder, depression, bipolar disorder, a mood disorder, if you are having trouble with your relationship, or even if you just need some advice about a problem. There are thousands of online therapy sources on the internet such as BetterHelp.com, which has over 2,000 licensed professionals that can help you. However, if you are in need of immediate emergency care, need medication, or are having suicidal thoughts, you should call a hotline such as the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255.

Is Online Therapy Effective?

Studies have shown that online therapy is just as effective as face to face therapy. In fact, in some cases it is better than regular therapy because people who need it are more likely to use it because it is easier for them to get. Those with mental health disorders usually tend to put things off or set appointments and not show up. This may be due to the anxiety of going somewhere, embarrassment of being seen at a psychiatrist’s office, or just because some people with depression or anxiety do not want to get out of bed some days. Therefore, online therapy can be much more effective.

What Makes Online Therapy Better than Traditional Therapy?

Online therapy is more convenient because you do not have to set an appointment, get transportation, find a babysitter, or take time off work or school. It is also less expensive because the therapists have less overhead such as rent, transportation, and paying employees to work in the office. It is also more private and easy to just log into the website or chat room to talk to your therapist from wherever you are. Even if you are stuck in traffic and want to get something off your mind, you can use your smartphone to email, chat, or even text your therapist. (Not while driving of course! You’re the passenger in this scenario.) Online therapy can also be a big benefit to those who are embarrassed or have trouble talking about their feelings face to face. You are in control of the conversation at all times. You also do not need an appointment so you can contact your therapist any time, 24 hours per day, seven days a week. So, what are you waiting for?

What do you think? Would you try online therapy? Or recommend it to someone who, for whatever reason, finds traditional therapy difficult? I’d love to hear your thoughts!

 

Marie Miguel has been a writing and research expert for nearly a decade, covering a variety of health- related topics. Currently, she is contributing to the expansion and growth of online mental health resources with BetterHelp.com. With an interest and dedication to addressing stigmas associated with mental health, she continues to specifically target subjects related to anxiety and depression.