Read before the movie comes out!

the-girl-on-the-train-collage

Have you read The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins? Planning on seeing the film adaptation starring Emily Blunt, Justin Theroux, Allison Janney and Rebecca Ferguson? If you haven’t read the book, there’s still time! Go grab yourself a copy before the movie version hits theaters October 7th. You won’t be sorry!

Synopsis:
Rachel takes the same commuter train every morning and night. Every day she rattles down the track, flashes past a stretch of cozy suburban homes, and stops at the signal that allows her to daily watch the same couple breakfasting on their deck. She’s even started to feel like she knows them. Jess and Jason, she calls them. Their life—as she sees it—is perfect. Not unlike the life she recently lost.

And then she sees something shocking. It’s only a minute until the train moves on, but it’s enough. Now everything’s changed. Unable to keep it to herself, Rachel goes to the police. But is she really as unreliable as they say? Soon she is deeply entangled not only in the investigation but in the lives of everyone involved. Has she done more harm than good?

I literally couldn’t put this book down (So many twists!) and the trailer for the film looks AMAZING. I’m planning to see the movie in the theater on my birthday. (We leave for a trip to Louisiana the next day so it seemed like the perfect, low-key outing.) Eeps! Can’t wait!

Buy the book HERE!

Watch the trailer HERE! 

Books to Read This Fall

Mourning those Summer months? Me either! I’m too excited about wrapping up, burrito-style, in a fluffy blanket with a good book and something pumpkin spice close at hand.

But for real, what better reason than a temperature turn-down to share a few favorite books I think would be perfect for your Fall reading list.

So, in the midst of all your other autumnal activities (Think: swapping out all your flip flops for riding boots and Snapchatting from the pumpkin patch.) — here are 5 books to read this Fall…

bossypantsBossypants by Tina Fey

Tina Fey’s book is short, messy, and impossibly funny (an apt description of the comedian herself). From her humble roots growing up in Pennsylvania to her days doing amateur improv in Chicago to her early sketches on SNL, Fey gives us a fascinating glimpse behind the curtain of modern comedy with equal doses of wit, candor, and self-deprecation.

There’s always something to be learned from the life experiences of fascinating (and funny!) people. This book provides a peek into the worlds of improv, SNL, and 30 Rock–all with Fey’s famous humor.

 

the-painter-from-shanghaiThe Painter from Shanghai by Jennifer Cody Epstein

Down the muddy waters of the Yangtze River, through the raucous glamour of prewar Shanghai and the bohemian splendor of 1920s Paris, and back to a China teetering on the brink of revolution: this is the epic story of Pan Yuliang, one of the most talented—and provocative—Chinese artists of the twentieth century.

Historical fiction so researched and rich in details that you will find yourself completely immersed in another time and place.

 

 

a-secret-kept A Secret Kept by Tatiana de Rosnay

Antoine Rey thought he had the perfect surprise for his sister Mélanie’s birthday: a weekend by the sea at Noirmoutier Island , where the pair spent many happy childhood summers playing on the beach. But the island’s haunting beauty triggers more than happy memories.

A French family, a fascinating story, and an unraveling secret at the heart of it all that will keep you reading well past your bedtime. Beware: you may finish de Rosnay’s mystery novel in one go!

 

 

the-namesakeThe Namesake by Jhumpa Lahiri

The Namesake takes the Ganguli family from their tradition-bound life in Calcutta through their fraught transformation into Americans. Son, Gogol Ganguli, knows only that he suffers the burden of his heritage as well as his odd name. Lahiri brings great empathy to Gogol as he stumbles along the first-generation path, strewn with conflicting loyalties, comic detours, and wrenching love affairs.’

Rather than follow a plot, this book follows a life. The resulting prose is breathtaking in it’s beauty.

 

behind-the-beautiful-foreversBehind the Beautiful Forevers by Katherine Boo

In this book by Pulitzer Prize winner Katherine Boo, a bewildering age is made human through the dramatic story of families striving toward a better life in a makeshift settlement near the Mumbai airport. Based on years of uncompromising reporting, it carries the reader headlong into one of the twenty-first century’s hidden worlds—and into the hearts of families impossible to forget.

True to the style of “embedded journalism,” Boo embedded herself in a slum so readers could see, hear, and understand the residents and their challenges.

 

What are YOU reading this Fall? Share below! 

***

Want to receive an extra dose of delight in your inbox? SUBSCRIBE! You’ll receive a weekly newsletter from Finding Delight chock-full of all sorts of goodies (incl. the ocassional book recommendation!). Thanks so much! xoxo

mid-week round-up

horsehead

What’s going on this week, guys? I hope you’re enjoying the book-themed week here on the blog. It seems fitting, given all the rain we’ve been getting, I just want to curl up on the couch and read novel after novel. Are you reading anything good right now? Hope your day is great wherever you are, and below are a few reads of a different variety (back to all-things books tomorrow though!)…

Voyages: Visual journeys by 6 photographers.

10 New Orleans musts for under $10.

Stop taking pride in not knowing how to do basic shit.

This ballerina starts her day with a corn-dog as a PRE-breakfast. (#spiritanimal)

Confessions of workplace masturbators.

I’m saving this podcast for a rainy day…or road trip.

Female debaters everywhere feel ya Hillz!

How to decorate a large wall.

30-minute sheet pan potatoes and chicken sausage.

Investments that will save you money in the long run.

Hugo Lucitante’s tribe sent him into the outside world so he could return and save their village.

Typecast as a terrorist.

5 Great Ways to Save Money on Books

Hey friends! To continue with our week of all things book-related here on Finding Delight, I’ve got a guest post by fellow blogger and book-lover, Cassie

sweet-reading

Books are an amazing, enlightening and empowering force, one that has the possibility to change the world or at least the perspective of their readers. I can’t recommend enough that everyone should be indulging in the secrets of their pages as much as possible.

However, a stark truth that has to be faced is books are often expensive. New and popular releases regularly come with a hefty price tag. Avid readers often find themselves gazing longingly at titles they just can’t afford. These five tips are all great ways to save money when buying books, thus opening you up to a whole range of exciting new titles to explore.

Avoid the Hardback

While hardbacks are a beautiful and tempting product for any book lover—who doesn’t crave their shiny covers and satisfying weightiness when you read them—they are also by far the priciest. In fact, they’re often double the price of their paperback counterparts and can be over ten times more expensive than the e-book version.

While treasuring those beautiful books might seem like an important pursuit, if you remind yourself that you can indulge in numerous alternative literary delights for the same cost, then it will soon become easy to put them back on the shelf and save your pennies! Some people might argue that e-books are just as expensive since you have to add the initial cost of an e-reader, but there are numerous apps that let you download the releases directly onto phones, tablets or laptops that you already own.

Take Advantage of Project Gutenberg

There are so many classic novels that have been produced by influential and pioneering authors all throughout history. Each one of these pieces of literature is a must-read for any bookworm’s list. What’s even better is a large amount of these works can be found and read for absolutely free.

Project Gutenberg is an online resource founded in 1971 to help support the distribution of e-books. It provides readers with a staggering collection of works whose copyrights have expired, books that are in the public domain. The law around copyright varies, but in general, most books find themselves in the public domain so many years after their original author has died. The site currently holds over 50,000 titles, and many of these are famed classics—think Jane Austen, H.G. Wells, Lewis Carroll and hundreds of other timeless authors. 

Use a Virtual Private Network

The internet does wonders for helping us spend less on books. However, what many users fail to realize is the internet is not created equal. Book distribution websites and services often restrict their catalogs depending on region via a process called geo-blocking. In short, this works by identifying the IP address on your Kindle device or computer and only allowing you to view or purchase books available in your region. This means you can often miss out on great titles and deals just because you’re based in a certain country.

A Virtual Private Network (VPN) is a handy piece of software that enables users to choose which country their server appears to be browsing from. The Kindle catalog in particular is notorious for setting up deals based on location, so by installing a VPN you can check that you aren’t missing out on great savings elsewhere. The software also provides an added layer of security to protect your credit card details when buying online. Secure Thoughts is a leading review site if you want to find out more information.

Browse the Discount Sites

As well as Kindle deals, there are many other dedicated sites that can be found online that specialize in providing discounted versions of your favorite novels. Students are probably already familiar with Half.com, as many use it to cut the cost of textbooks, but it’s also a wonderful resource for anyone looking to find great deals on favorite books. 

Powered by eBay, it’s run on the same concept as the main site but specifically caters to book lovers. Sellers can use the platform to clear out secondhand copies of books they’ve read, making it the perfect way to find discounts. As users have to compete to attract buyers to their products, you can often find significant savings if you’re willing to dig deep enough. As most books are secondhand, it’s also worth keeping an eye out for quality.

This trick is one that can be used when buying paperbacks from Amazon, as often titles can be found secondhand from individual sellers for a fraction of the bookshop price. These deals often come up when you do a search, so be sure to check them out before committing to a purchase!

Participate in a Book Swap

Last but not least, and my personal favorite way to save money on books, is the classic book swap. The concept is simple: you can pick up a new (to you) book, and all you have to do is leave another one in exchange. It’s a common practice in hostels, as travelers aren’t able to cart around large quantities of reading material, but it’s also becoming a regular occurrence in neighborhoods.

In England, many public telephone boxes—which are now largely seen as redundant —have been transformed into mini book swap libraries where passers-by can browse, borrow and donate books in return. It’s free of charge and a great way to drum up interest in literature and even engagement in your local community. If you don’t have a handy resource like this available near you, then you can get together with fellow book lovers from your friend circle, each bring a few unwanted titles and have your own mini swap session! 

Money should never be a reason for not getting your fill of reading. There are always new and innovative solutions to your financial problems when it comes to books. These are just five of my most-used tactics, but if you have any more tips and tricks, then I’d love to hear your ideas! Be sure to leave a comment below.


About the Author: Cassie is an entertainment and technology blogger for Culture Coverage. She’s been an avid reader all her life and loves that the internet has made it easier than ever to access the greatest stories out there.

 

(Photo by Galina Kochergina.)

A Random Read

img_0776

Today, I’d love to kick off a week where we discuss all things book-related. Whatta ya say? Are you in?

So, I just finished this Hoda Kotb book and I gotta say, it was a complete impulse purchase. Not to say it’s TOTALLY outside the range of something I would normally read…because, well, under the right circumstances I’d read almost anything. But, other than a slight affinity for the drunken antics of the Today Show’s fourth hour, it IS a pretty random selection. Sometimes I just start reading something in the store or online (Damn you Amazon’s read the first few pages option!!) and then think “Welp, I gotta see this through so I’m either gonna live on this Half Price Books aisle for the next day or so or this puppy’s comin’ home with me.”

This is why I normally just stick to libraries.

Anyways, it was a pretty inspirational read so I thought I’d let y’all know a bit more about it!

A break-down of the book…

In Ten Years Later, Hoda looks at 6 life-changing moments experienced by 6 different people. She then returns a decade later to find out; where are they now? From an athlete suffering chronic seizures to a drug-addicted TV producer, each faced obstacles many would describe as insurmountable. Yet each managed, somehow, to set their life’s course headed in a positive direction. Their stories are incredible and powerful. Their lives reaffirm the idea that resilience and strength can come from adversity.

And each outcome speaks to my personal belief that when you’re face-down on the pavement…there’s nowhere left to fall.

Read if you enjoy…

…the heartwarming segments on news shows like 60 Minutes and Dateline.

In which I imagine a hypothetical situation that would be especially conducive for this read…

Your return flight from a 3-day business trip has been delayed and you have 8 hours to kill before any hope of finding your way onto a plane. You stop by the book shop and pick up this paperback. You make your way to a restaurant where and spot a booth tucked in the corner. Proceed to order 2-3 glasses of wine because you suspect that’s what Hoda would WANT you to do. Your flight delay situation will start to look a WHOLE lot better stacked up against tongue cancer, trust me. (#Perspective) And hey, all the stories come with happy endings so there’s hope for you yet! (#SpoilerAlert)

Are you reading anything good right now? Ever impulse buy a book that surprised you?

Two Poems

poems-on-a-road-trip

These two poems by Naomi Shihab Nye rank high on my list of favorite poems. They are both so simple and strikingly beautiful. I always like to read poems out loud (something about actually hearing the rhythms and the rhymes make them all the more powerful, don’t you think?). I can’t make it through either of these without reaching a line that makes my voice catch. I thought I’d share them with you in case you’d like to read them today. Perhaps you’ll find some inspiration or power within their lines.

The Traveling Onion

“It is believed that the onion originally came from India. In Egypt it was an object of worship —why I haven’t been able to find out. From Egypt the onion entered Greece and on to Italy, thence into all of Europe.” — Better Living Cookbook

When I think how far the onion has traveled

just to enter my stew today, I could kneel and praise

all small forgotten miracles,

crackly paper peeling on the drainboard,

pearly layers in smooth agreement,

the way the knife enters onion

and onion falls apart on the chopping block,

a history revealed.

And I would never scold the onion

for causing tears.

It is right that tears fall

for something small and forgotten.

How at meal, we sit to eat,

commenting on texture of meat or herbal aroma

but never on the translucence of onion,

now limp, now divided,

or its traditionally honorable career:

For the sake of others,

disappear.

***

Kindness

Before you know what kindness really is

you must lose things,

feel the future dissolve in a moment

like salt in a weakened broth.

What you held in your hand,

what you counted and carefully saved,

all this must go so you know

how desolate the landscape can be

between the regions of kindness.

How you ride and ride

thinking the bus will never stop,

the passengers eating maize and chicken

will stare out the window forever.

Before you learn the tender gravity of kindness,

you must travel where the Indian in a white poncho

lies dead by the side of the road.

You must see how this could be you,

how he too was someone

who journeyed through the night with plans

and the simple breath that kept him alive.

Before you know kindness as the deepest thing inside,

you must know sorrow as the other deepest thing.

You must wake up with sorrow.

You must speak to it till your voice

catches the thread of all sorrows

and you see the size of the cloth.

Then it is only kindness that makes sense anymore,

only kindness that ties your shoes

and sends you out into the day to mail letters and purchase bread,

only kindness that raises its head

from the crowd of the world to say

It is I you have been looking for,

and then goes with you everywhere

like a shadow or a friend.

(Top image by Matthew Tammaro via here.)

mid-week round-up

sunrise-over-a-field

What are you up to this week, friends? I’m hoping to head to the beach tomorrow and relax with some new library books (and maybe a margarita). It feels like Summer should be winding down but here in Miami the temperature tends to disagree. I have a feeling there’s still plenty of beach possibilities ahead. Also, I’m thrilled with how all our wedding posts have turned out. If you’d like to have a browse through all of them you can do so HERE. Thanks to everyone for being so sweet about my rampant over-sharing. Ok, now onto some links…

How Angelina Jolie continues to masterfully control the public narrative around her.

Where was this adorable fairy door when I was a kid?

Silicon Valley’s quest to make periods cool.

Tribes redraw land boundaries with GPS and a fleet of drones.

California might finally be cracking down on…cow farts.

Are we all just manic information addicts?

How Little House on the Prairie built modern conservatism. 

The unusual origins of pink lemonade.

Describing colors to the blind.

They say New York is over-photographed. He disagrees.

Scientific proof that Americans basically eat dessert for breakfast.

Is it still “diversity” or “inclusion” if no one is broke on TV?

Wedding: The Reception

reception-collage

Finally, our reception! After a delicious gumbo dinner, our guests continued to grab drinks from the bar (Of course we had to include cold cans and bottles of our favorite soda, Ale-8!), munch on home-made cupcakes, and chat.

breauxmancerecep_10901

breauxmancerecep_11301

Before we cut the cake, our friends gave toasts. I’ve known Chad since high school and Chet and Ganer go way back as well so it was such a treat to have them speak on our behalf. Their speeches were eloquent, beautiful, and funny to boot! I pretty much cry-laughed (Is that a thing?) the whole time.

breauxmancerecep_13491

breauxmancerecep_13681

Next up, my sister called everyone back into the Performance Hall for a little musical surprise. She performed a mash-up of “Where You Lead” and this Rebecca Lavelle song. (They’re the theme songs of two of our favorite tv shows–Gilmore Girls and McLeod’s Daughters.) It was too perfect!

breauxmancerecep_14101

Finally, we cranked up a playlist of our favorite songs and cut loose on the dance floor. Above we are serving some Bob the Drag Queen *REALNESS* to Purse First. Below we are spinning, vogueing, and singing along to Lost Bayou Ramblers, RuPaul, and Lady Gaga, respectively.

breauxmancerecep_13361

breauxmancerecep_14921

breauxmancerecep_15561

In the midst of the revelry, Chet and I made our way upstairs and stole a kiss as our guests cheered below. Such a cheeky but magical moment. Haha!

breauxmancerecep_15491

cheapside-collage

And then, as the reception drew to a close, we headed down the street to a nearby bar and enjoyed the company of our friends and family all the way ’til closing time. What an amazing party! I couldn’t have asked for a better reception and that was entirely due to the company we keep. Thank you to everyone who helped us celebrate! We love you!!!

Thank you so much for indulging me as I shared a bajillion posts about our wedding. I hope you enjoyed them. I certainly enjoyed creating them and getting to re-live such a magnificent weekend full of love and loved ones.

Of course, none of these posts would be possible without the beautiful images captured by Sur La Lune Photography. So, immense love and gratitude to Carrie and Ganer for managing to preserve the day exactly as we saw it through our own eyes. You both amaze and inspire me. We will treasure our wedding photos forever and hold you in our hearts for just as long! xoxo

Wedding: Dinner and Dessert

breauxmancecocktail_09151

When it was time to feed our guests, Chet proudly brought up the huge pots of gumbo that had been slowly cooking in the kitchen below all day. (Including a vegan gumbo!) Pretty much as soon as we set our wedding date he decided he wanted to cook our reception dinner himself. Although many folks tried to tell him preparing food would be the LAST thing he’d want to do the morning of his wedding, I’m so happy he didn’t listen, and I think he really enjoyed the opportunity to feed so many of our loved ones.

breauxmancecocktail_09191

We also put out platters of charcuterie, cheese, salad, rolls, and potato salad that we ordered from Good Foods Co-op. Everything was so delicious and looked pretty, too!

breauxmancerecep_10441

breauxmancerecep_10461

breauxmancerecep_10711

For dessert, my mom baked two kinds of cupcakes. The groom cupcakes, per Chet’s request, were peanut butter and jelly. The bride cupcakes were berry shortcake. My mom doesn’t mess around when it comes to cupcakes. The pb&j had a creamy peanut butter center and the bride cupcakes were stuffed with a little pocket of fresh berries.

breauxmancerecep_10791

And the lovely Good Foods Co-op bakery made us this tiny, two-tier cake. Isn’t it adorable?

breauxmancerecep_10801

(Chet’s boutonniere is from Michler’s Florist + Greenhouse. The chalkboard labels were purchased at Office Depot and we got the 3-tier cupcake display on Amazon.)

(Photos by Sur La Lune Photography.)