Tag Archives: watch now

4 Creepy Movies to Get You Ready for Halloween

As soon as the weather starts to cool off, I LOVE watching scary movies on Friday nights. I don’t know what it is! Maybe purposefully lookin’ to get spooked is more fun when you’re curled up in a blanky (the easier to cover your face during the stressful parts!). Or maybe it’s that Halloween is fast approaching! If you wanna get in the mood and have your own private scarefest, here are a few creepy movies Chet and I have watched recently that I would recommend…

1. I Think We’re Alone Now

Del is alone in the world. After the human race is wiped out, he lives in his small, empty town, content in his solitude and the utopia he’s methodically created for himself — until he is discovered by Grace, an interloper whose history and motives are obscure. And to make matters worse, she wants to stay.

I love any post-apocalyptic film that showcases a realistic look at survival tactics. As soon as the film began with Peter Dinklage in a house scavenging for batteries…I was in. But there’s a looming sense throughout the movie that something isn’t as it seems–even as the quiet scenes and calming natural light settle you in to this simpler way of life.

WATCH THE TRAILER HERE

2. Hereditary

When the matriarch of the Graham family passes away, her daughter and grandchildren begin to unravel cryptic and increasingly terrifying secrets about their ancestry, trying to outrun the sinister fate they have inherited.

This movie will make you think but also provide all the jumps and gasps of a truly frightening horror film. The creepiness is in the details though…so you’ll wanna play close attention during this one. Don’t let all the “Hereditary Explained” articles and YouTube videos discourage you. Just watch and come to your OWN conclusions.

WATCH THE TRAILER HERE

3. Like Me

A reckless loner, desperate for human connection, sets out on a crime spree that she broadcasts on social media. Her reality quickly splinters into a surreal nightmare as her exploits spiral out of control.

I didn’t know much about this movie going in–I just saw the words “indie thriller” and “commentary on YouTube” and was down to press play. This one was aesthetically very creepy, but also stomach churning. If you’re tuning in for Shane Dawson’s Jake Paul series, I have a feeling this might serve as a good complimentary film.

WATCH THE TRAILER HERE

4. Mother!

A couple’s relationship is tested when uninvited guests arrive at their home, disrupting their tranquil existence. From filmmaker Darren Aronofsky (Black Swan, Requiem for a Dream), this riveting psychological thriller is about love, devotion and sacrifice.

I had heard mostly bad things about this film but was willing to give it a shot because I love Black Swan (and JLaw!) so much. And I’m glad I did! It had everything I want in a psychological thriller. Similar to Hereditary, if you go into this film worried less about what things are supposed to  mean and instead draw your own conclusions, you’ll have a creepier more satisfying viewing experience!

WATCH THE TRAILER HERE

Have you watched any creepy movies lately that you would recommend? Do you watch more scary films in the Autumn?

P.S. Need more movie recommendations? RIGHT THIS WAY!
P.P.S. If you enjoyed this content and would like to support my sweet blog (thank you!)–click HERE.

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6 True-Crime Documentaries For Your Inner Detective

6-true-crime

Over the last month or so I’ve been on a bit of a true-crime documentary binge. I just can’t get enough! There’s something about the unanswered questions, colorful cast of characters, and inevitable courtroom drama that captivates my little “Law & Order” lovin’ heart. So, I decided to round-up a few of my recent faves in case you’re feeling a similar urge.

If you binge watched The Jinx or Making a Murderer in a matter of days or waited anxiously for the release of each new episode of Serial, may I suggest giving one of these bad boys a try…

The Fear of 13

After more than 20 years on death row, a convicted murderer petitions the court for his long awaited execution. But as he tells his story, it becomes clear that nothing is quite what it seems.

Amanda Knox

Follow the trial, conviction and acquittal of Amanda Knox for the murder of a fellow exchange student in Italy.

Who Took Johnny

An investigation of a cold case tries to determine what became of Iowa paperboy Johnny Gosch, who disappeared 30 years earlier.

There’s Something Wrong with Aunt Diane

The accident made national headlines: a suburban mother drove the wrong way on the Taconic Parkway in upstate New York and crashed head-on into an SUV, killing herself and seven others.  But was she the monster the public made her out to be?

Beware the Slenderman

The mythos of a faceless, digital-age bogeyman known as Slenderman was created on the Internet, but his influence was felt in the real world when two 12-year-old girls lured their friend into the woods for a brutal murder.

Paradise Lost Trilogy

Note: The previous five are all fairly new but Paradise Lost is more of a classic. If you’ve never seen the full trilogy, I definitely recommend watching all three. They’re pretty incredible and the filmmakers paved the way for this sort of storytelling. (Buy the DVD’s HERE.)

The landmark documentary that sparked an international movement to ‘Free the West Memphis Three’, PARADISE LOST investigates the gruesome 1993 murder of three eight-year-old boys and the three teenagers accused of killing them as part of a Satanic ritual. REVELATIONS delves deeply into the shocking aftermath of the trials, updating the story seven years after the murders. PURGATORY picks up the story and reexamines the horrifying crime with fresh insights that only the passage of time can provide.

Which would YOU watch? Oh, and what’s your favorite documentary of all time? I’d love to know!

P.S. Turning to True-Crime Books to Curb the Serial Withdrawals. Binge-Worthy TV Shows. 

Share the shame.

journals

The other night, I watched the documentary “Mortified Nation.” A film about the stage show “Mortified” which, if you haven’t heard of, is basically a platform for adults to share their childhood writings with an audience of strangers. “Mortified Nation” combines performance footage from various shows with details on conception, implementation and production. In the opening scene, a teenager talks about her own private writings in her diary. She discusses this sacred book with reverence and questions; why would ANYONE want to read journal entries out loud to a room full of strangers? And you might be thinking the same thing. Yes, the stories shared by various performers throughout the film were embarrassing but they were also hilarious, deeply relatable and a gentle reminder that no matter who we become, when you get right down to it, we all came from the same place. A childhood where everything that happened was of grave importance when funnelled through a limited life experience.

 

 

After reading “The Geeks Shall Inherit the Earth,” this documentary really resonated with me both as a reminder of how we should be relating to teens and the emerging geek chic culture which Robinson discusses. As adults, it is easy to brush off the feelings and worries of children as unimportant. But “Mortified” literally spotlights some of the most important moments in these young lives. The performer embodies the younger version of themselves where first kisses, crushes, hatred were BIG. They grapple with emerging sexuality and conflicts with parents and we can relate. Yet, too often, put a real live teen in front of us with these same struggles and we think “you ain’t seen nothin’ yet, kid.” Young adults are starting to celebrate themselves (and the dorky childhoods that begot them) and serving as perfect examples for Robinson’s “quirk theory”–the characteristics that make your life terrible as a teen earn you accolades as an adult. For participants of “Mortified” these accolades are real, quantifiable celebrations like applause and laughter. Unsurprisingly, people go to these shows and leave wanting to participate. They want to share the shame. And I’ll be honest, watching the documentary made me want to do the same.

 

lafayettehs

 

I’m much too flighty to have ever kept extended written accounts of my life. I’m always jealous of the people who have boxes full of nostalgia hidden under their bed. (The mormons are the best at this, aren’t they? Shout out to y’all!) Unfortunately, I’ve moved a lot and every so often I just get an unquenchable urge to throw shit away. I would also rather tell people my secrets then keep them under lock and key. Even an old online journal, tucked away in a forgotten corner of the internet, is gone. Kept for over four years, it would have made some great “Mortified” fodder. My account of every teenage first has disappeared into the ether of now defunct websites from the early aughts. To be real, thinking about it bums me out…more than it maybe should. Of course, I am me –I should know how I felt during those years (which were BIG years: I lived abroad, went to proms, had a couple boyfriends, got into college, won some speech things…lost my dad) but going back to THE exact moment where the emotions, good or bad, had bubbled up to a boiling point so dire that you had to get them out or risk implosion–is different. And I think it’s ok for those of us who didn’t set out to be great life historians to be a little sad we can’t go back. At least not in the same way our peers can who were and are.

Of note: Strawberry Shortcake bandana, velour jacket, track pants and an INTENSE addiction to fountain Diet Cokes from the McD's up the road from LHS.
Of note: Strawberry Shortcake bandana, velour jacket, track pants and an INTENSE addiction to fountain Diet Cokes from the McD’s up the road from LHS.
Of note: Speech camp!
Of note: Speech camp! 

I also wonder what “Mortified” would look like in subsequent generations. Now, more than ever before, we are all curators of a very public scrapbook of our own lives. Key word here being public. The “Mortified” performances are so raw because they ARE those secrets we once thought we would die if anyone uncovered. As one performer noted, “ If you’ve got something you feel like you would kill yourself if people found out, there’s no way you can hold on to that.”  The advent of social media has completely turned this on it’s head. We are a culture who shares everything–and our youth are not excluded from this practice. We also adapt our accounts for audience. Admit it, we are all guilty of this. Myself included. When I look back at the online scrapbook I’m creating through Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, etc. in say, 10 years; will I see various vignettes of the most important moments in my life? Or will I see the moments I thought others would believe were the most important? The moments which would gain me instant gratification through immediate and public peer approval? Perhaps THIS is the very thing that will mortify us in the future. Only time will tell.

 


Do you have embarrassing journals, letters, song lyrics from your past? Would you ever read them to a room full of strangers? If you’re in the mood for a hearty laugh with a shot to the arm of empathy, I wholeheartedly recommend this documentary, which is now streaming on Netflix.

(Picture of my high school via here. I love that it looks like a faded postcard. Embarrassing high school photos via Facebook by way of Rachel and Matt. : )