Tag Archives: thriller

If You Like That Book, You Might Like This Book || BOOK RECOMMENDATIONS pt. 1

Hi guys! Today, I’d like to offer you a few book recommendations in the form of “if you liked this book, then you might like this other book.” I love when folks on Booktube, Bookstagram, and Goodreads include comparisons to other books in their reviews! It’s one of my favorite ways to find new reads! So, I thought it might be fun and potentially helpful to readers to start a new bookish series here on the blog.

Basically, I’m going to be recommending books that are similar to very popular books that are more well-known. Let’s get into it, shall we?!

If you liked Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel,
you might like Blindness by José Saramago

If you thought Station Eleven was a stunning and powerful portrayal of humanity’s will to survive as a sickness sweeps the land, I think you should check out Blindness. This book stuck with me long after I read the final page. It is haunting and shattering, but honest and compassionate.

Synopsis:

A city is hit by an epidemic of “white blindness” which spares no one. Authorities confine the blind to an empty mental hospital, but there the criminal element holds everyone captive, stealing food rations and raping women. There is one eyewitness to this nightmare who guides seven strangers—among them a boy with no mother, a girl with dark glasses, a dog of tears—through the barren streets, and the procession becomes as uncanny as the surroundings are harrowing. A magnificent parable of loss and disorientation, Blindness has swept the reading public with its powerful portrayal of our worst appetites and weaknesses—and humanity’s ultimately exhilarating spirit.

If you liked The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls,
you might like Priestdaddy by Patricia Lockwood

If you enjoyed reading Jeannette Walls recount her heartbreaking yet oftentimes wacky childhood,  you should check out Patricia Lockwood who also explores how family and tradition shape her identity. Her book is wildly original and her family members are written so vividly they practically leap off the page.

Synopsis:

Father Greg Lockwood is unlike any Catholic priest you have ever met—a man who lounges in boxer shorts, loves action movies, and whose constant jamming on the guitar reverberates “like a whole band dying in a plane crash in 1972.” His daughter is an irreverent poet who long ago left the Church’s country. When an unexpected crisis leads her and her husband to move back into her parents’ rectory, their two worlds collide.

If you liked The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins,
you might like The Woman in the Window by A.J. Finn

If The Girl on the Train made you realize you’re a fan of psychological thrillers with a dash of noir, The Woman in the Window is for you.  It is dazzlingly suspenseful and full of twists that will keep you reading long past bedtime. The movie adaptation starring Amy Adams, Julianne Moore and Gary Oldman is out soon!

Synopsis: 

Anna Fox lives alone—a recluse in her New York City home, unable to venture outside. She spends her day drinking wine (maybe too much), watching old movies, recalling happier times . . . and spying on her neighbors. Then the Russells move into the house across the way: a father, a mother, their teenage son. The perfect family. But when Anna, gazing out her window one night, sees something she shouldn’t, her world begins to crumble—and its shocking secrets are laid bare.

If you liked My Sister, The Serial Killer by Oyinkan Braithwaite,
you might like Queenie by Candice Carty-Williams

Both of these books are witty quick reads that are darkly hilarious but serve up some pretty serious subject matter. While Braithwaite’s book falls more in the thriller category and Queenie is more of a hard-hitting contemporary — they are both disarming, political, and unexpectedly FUNNY.

Synopsis:

Queenie Jenkins is a 25-year-old Jamaican British woman living in London, straddling two cultures and slotting neatly into neither. She works at a national newspaper, where she’s constantly forced to compare herself to her white middle-class peers. After a messy break-up from her white long-term boyfriend, Queenie seeks comfort in all the wrong places…including several hazardous men who do a good job of occupying brain space and a bad job of affirming self-worth.

That was soooooo fun and I can’t wait to bring you round 2! Have you read any of these books? What would you compare them to?

P.S. How to make time for books. 

TV Recommendation: Westworld

westworld

Have you seen the TV show Westworld yet? The series takes place in a futuristic, Wild West-themed amusement park full of lifelike robots called “hosts”. Tourists pay a premium for access to the park and are allowed to live out their fantasies amidst the hosts without consequence or fear of retaliation. But things are changing…

Westworld was created for HBO and is based on the 1973 film of the same name, which was written and directed by Michael Crichton. This show’s ever-unfolding plot will keep you on the edge of your seat. And in case you thought you didn’t need science fiction western thriller as a television genre…trust me, you do.

Here’s a trailer, if you’d like to see…

Obviously Anthony Hopkins, who plays a founder of the park, doesn’t disappoint. He’s a veteran and this role is perfect for him. But the rest of the cast seems to be right up to Hopkins-level snuff. I thought Thandie Newton, especially, was exquisite. (Evan Rachel Wood was also BAE. Even though for the entirety of my viewing experience I thought she was the same person as Rachel Brosnahan, who was in House of Cards and Manhattan, and was like, “How is this chick in so many good TV shows??!” My bad! Still impressed, just not AS impressed. LOL!)

Pro-tip: If you don’t have HBO but you DO have Amazon Prime you can sign up for a free 30-day trial of HBO on Amazon Channels. 30 days is plenty of time to watch this series (and honestly you could probably squeeze in 2 or 3 more shows after that!).

P.S. 5 other binge-worthy television shows.

Read before the movie comes out!

the-girl-on-the-train-collage

Have you read The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins? Planning on seeing the film adaptation starring Emily Blunt, Justin Theroux, Allison Janney and Rebecca Ferguson? If you haven’t read the book, there’s still time! Go grab yourself a copy before the movie version hits theaters October 7th. You won’t be sorry!

Synopsis:
Rachel takes the same commuter train every morning and night. Every day she rattles down the track, flashes past a stretch of cozy suburban homes, and stops at the signal that allows her to daily watch the same couple breakfasting on their deck. She’s even started to feel like she knows them. Jess and Jason, she calls them. Their life—as she sees it—is perfect. Not unlike the life she recently lost.

And then she sees something shocking. It’s only a minute until the train moves on, but it’s enough. Now everything’s changed. Unable to keep it to herself, Rachel goes to the police. But is she really as unreliable as they say? Soon she is deeply entangled not only in the investigation but in the lives of everyone involved. Has she done more harm than good?

I literally couldn’t put this book down (So many twists!) and the trailer for the film looks AMAZING. I’m planning to see the movie in the theater on my birthday. (We leave for a trip to Louisiana the next day so it seemed like the perfect, low-key outing.) Eeps! Can’t wait!

Buy the book HERE!

Watch the trailer HERE!