Tag Archives: reading material

If You Like That Book, You Might Like This Book || BOOK RECOMMENDATIONS pt. 2

Hi guys! Today, I’d like to offer you a few book recommendations in the form of “if you liked this book, then you might like this other book.” I love when folks on Booktube, Bookstagram, and Goodreads include comparisons to other books in their reviews! It’s one of my favorite ways to find new reads! So, I thought it might be fun and potentially helpful to readers to start a new bookish series here on the blog. (Here’s part 1!)

Basically, I’m going to be recommending books that are similar to very popular books that are more well-known. Let’s get into it, shall we?!

If you liked A Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman,
you might like Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman

If Ove was the type of grumpy yet loveable character you can’t get enough of, you definitely should meet Eleanor. Eleanor is an out-of-the-ordinary heroine whose unconscious wit will remind readers of other favorite literary curmudgeons — even though she’s a fair bit younger than most. This book is smart and funny with the same feel-good, found-family vibes you loved in A Man Called Ove.

Synopsis:

Meet Eleanor Oliphant: she struggles with appropriate social skills and tends to say exactly what she’s thinking. Nothing is missing in her carefully timetabled life of avoiding unnecessary human contact, where weekends are punctuated by frozen pizza, vodka, and phone chats with Mummy. But everything changes when Eleanor meets Raymond, the bumbling and deeply unhygienic IT guy from her office. When she and Raymond together save Sammy, an elderly gentleman who has fallen, the three rescue one another from the lives of isolation that they had been living.

If you liked My Absolute Darling by Gabriel Tallent,
you might like Lights All Night Long by Lydia Fitzpatrick

If you enjoyed reading Gabriel Tallent’s novel about 14-year-old Turtle Alveston, you should check out Lydia Fitzpatrick’s dark coming-of-age tale in which we follow 15-year-old Ilya. Lights All Night Long is a richly told story that explores ideas of belonging, home, and family and I promise you won’t be able to put it down.

Synopsis:

Fifteen-year-old Ilya arrives in Louisiana from his native Russia for what should be the adventure of his life: a year in America as an exchange student. But all is not right in Ilya’s world: he’s consumed by the fate of his older brother Vladimir, the magnetic rebel to Ilya’s dutiful wunderkind, back in their tiny Russian hometown. The two have always been close, spending their days dreaming of escaping to America. But when Ilya was tapped for the exchange, Vladimir disappeared into their town’s seedy, drug-plagued underworld. Just before Ilya left, the murders of three young women rocked the town’s usual calm, and Vladimir found himself in prison.

If you liked Me Before You by Jojo Moyes,
you might like Evvie Drake Starts Over by Linda Holmes

If Me Before You made you realize you’re a fan of contemporary romances featuring a flawed and relatable heroine, Evvie Drake Starts Over is for you. Just like Me Before You, it is full of interesting characters who are sometimes annoying and make bad decisions but that’s real life and you love them anyways! Bonus points for being set in a small town in Maine with a retired professional baseball player as the love interest.

Synopsis: 

In a small town in Maine, recently widowed Eveleth “Evvie” Drake rarely leaves her house. Everyone in town, including her best friend, Andy, thinks grief keeps her locked inside, and she doesn’t correct them. In New York, Dean Tenney, former major-league pitcher and Andy’s childhood friend, is struggling with a case of the “yips”: he can’t throw straight anymore, and he can’t figure out why. An invitation from Andy to stay in Maine for a few months seems like the perfect chance to hit the reset button.

If you liked Small Great Things by Jodi Picoult,
you might like A Map of the World by Jane Hamilton

Both of these books tackle serious subject matter by laying out a fictional tragic accident and following all the twists and turns of the human heart and courtroom proceedings to reach their dramatic conclusions. While Picoult’s book offers a thought-provoking examination of racism and A Map of the World deals with disappearing rural American life — they both present gripping moral dilemmas that will leave readers asking important questions.

Synopsis:

The Goodwins, Howard, Alice, and their little girls, live on a dairy farm in Wisconsin. Although suspiciously regarded by their neighbors as “that hippie couple” because of their well-educated, urban background, Howard and Alice believe they have found a source of emotional strength in the farm, he tending the barn while Alice works as a nurse in the local elementary school. But their peaceful life is shattered one day when a neighbor’s two-year-old daughter drowns in the Goodwins’ pond while under Alice’s care. Tormented by the accident, Alice descends even further into darkness when she is accused of sexually abusing a student at the elementary school. Soon, Alice is arrested, incarcerated, and as good as convicted in the eyes of a suspicious community.

I hope you enjoyed these new recommendations and I’m excited to bring you round 3! Have you read any of these books? What would you compare them to?

P.S. You’ll notice a few of these selection on My Top 20 Books of 2019!

If You Like That Book, You Might Like This Book || BOOK RECOMMENDATIONS pt. 1

Hi guys! Today, I’d like to offer you a few book recommendations in the form of “if you liked this book, then you might like this other book.” I love when folks on Booktube, Bookstagram, and Goodreads include comparisons to other books in their reviews! It’s one of my favorite ways to find new reads! So, I thought it might be fun and potentially helpful to readers to start a new bookish series here on the blog.

Basically, I’m going to be recommending books that are similar to very popular books that are more well-known. Let’s get into it, shall we?!

If you liked Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel,
you might like Blindness by José Saramago

If you thought Station Eleven was a stunning and powerful portrayal of humanity’s will to survive as a sickness sweeps the land, I think you should check out Blindness. This book stuck with me long after I read the final page. It is haunting and shattering, but honest and compassionate.

Synopsis:

A city is hit by an epidemic of “white blindness” which spares no one. Authorities confine the blind to an empty mental hospital, but there the criminal element holds everyone captive, stealing food rations and raping women. There is one eyewitness to this nightmare who guides seven strangers—among them a boy with no mother, a girl with dark glasses, a dog of tears—through the barren streets, and the procession becomes as uncanny as the surroundings are harrowing. A magnificent parable of loss and disorientation, Blindness has swept the reading public with its powerful portrayal of our worst appetites and weaknesses—and humanity’s ultimately exhilarating spirit.

If you liked The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls,
you might like Priestdaddy by Patricia Lockwood

If you enjoyed reading Jeannette Walls recount her heartbreaking yet oftentimes wacky childhood,  you should check out Patricia Lockwood who also explores how family and tradition shape her identity. Her book is wildly original and her family members are written so vividly they practically leap off the page.

Synopsis:

Father Greg Lockwood is unlike any Catholic priest you have ever met—a man who lounges in boxer shorts, loves action movies, and whose constant jamming on the guitar reverberates “like a whole band dying in a plane crash in 1972.” His daughter is an irreverent poet who long ago left the Church’s country. When an unexpected crisis leads her and her husband to move back into her parents’ rectory, their two worlds collide.

If you liked The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins,
you might like The Woman in the Window by A.J. Finn

If The Girl on the Train made you realize you’re a fan of psychological thrillers with a dash of noir, The Woman in the Window is for you.  It is dazzlingly suspenseful and full of twists that will keep you reading long past bedtime. The movie adaptation starring Amy Adams, Julianne Moore and Gary Oldman is out soon!

Synopsis: 

Anna Fox lives alone—a recluse in her New York City home, unable to venture outside. She spends her day drinking wine (maybe too much), watching old movies, recalling happier times . . . and spying on her neighbors. Then the Russells move into the house across the way: a father, a mother, their teenage son. The perfect family. But when Anna, gazing out her window one night, sees something she shouldn’t, her world begins to crumble—and its shocking secrets are laid bare.

If you liked My Sister, The Serial Killer by Oyinkan Braithwaite,
you might like Queenie by Candice Carty-Williams

Both of these books are witty quick reads that are darkly hilarious but serve up some pretty serious subject matter. While Braithwaite’s book falls more in the thriller category and Queenie is more of a hard-hitting contemporary — they are both disarming, political, and unexpectedly FUNNY.

Synopsis:

Queenie Jenkins is a 25-year-old Jamaican British woman living in London, straddling two cultures and slotting neatly into neither. She works at a national newspaper, where she’s constantly forced to compare herself to her white middle-class peers. After a messy break-up from her white long-term boyfriend, Queenie seeks comfort in all the wrong places…including several hazardous men who do a good job of occupying brain space and a bad job of affirming self-worth.

That was soooooo fun and I can’t wait to bring you round 2! Have you read any of these books? What would you compare them to?

P.S. How to make time for books. 

mid-week round-up

What have you been up to loves? Last weekend, Chet and I saw Once Upon a Time in Hollywood…complete with a huge tub of popcorn. Have you seen it? Sometimes I just can’t get over how good an actor Leo is! Hope you have a fantastic week, do a few things for your own enjoyment, and here are some links you might want to check out…

The best street art in every state.

How to give constructive criticism without making it awkward.

Everyone knows about urine-detector dye, despite the fact that it has 100% never existed.

These cookies are my new favorite thing.

How to eat candy like a Swedish person.

24 books under 200 pages, recommended by TED speakers.

An ice cream truck owner who hates influencers so much he charges them double.

When should you tell a child their adopted?

A fish pie loaded with summer’s bounty.

Fall is right around the corner!

Sweet new merch from Call Your Girlfriend.

16 words people often mix up that can make you look foolish.

P.S. A few Finding Delight posts you may have missed — My Favorite Words and The Truths We Hold — Continued Material.

mid-week round-up

What’s going on this week? The countdown to Christmas is truly ON!! We had a wonderful long weekend in Louisiana visiting with Chet’s family. (We also ate all our favorite local specialties, saw the lights at the local zoo, and went to the movie theater to watch the new Spiderman movie — highly recommend.) We’re off for round 2 of holiday travels this weekend so for the next few days I’ll be running around like a mad woman trying to get everything done. Hope your week is a bit calmer than mine, and here are some links I’ve been reading this week…

RIP Penny Marshall, the first woman to direct a $100 million dollar grossing film.

How old are all the characters on Seinfeld?

The race to find the most precious religious relics.

The top 10 books of 2018, according to everyone.

The only small-talk worth having.

Devon Sawa, the original Stan, on who he stans.

Where Americans find meaning in life.

Is it time to nix the two-week pay cycle?

A cozy sweater to wear with leggings.

Your future grandchildren’s responses to how dating worked before apps.

Isabel Wilkerson on Michelle Obama’s book and the Great Migration.

[Related: The Warmth of Other Suns and Becoming.]

Made me laugh.

P.S. A few Finding Delight posts you may have missed — Books to Read if You’re in Search of a History Lesson and 3 At-Home Date Night Ideas.

mid-week round-up

meerkats

What have you been up to this week? Sunday warmed up a bit around these parts and it was just agreeable enough for my friend Jessica and I to loop about her neighborhood and blow some of the winter stink off. Also, I just started the Yoga with Adriene 30 Day Yoga Challenge (I LOVED the Erin Motz 30 Day Challenge so here’s hoping this one is fun as well!), and yesterday I sliced my thumb while attempting to cut fruit too early in the morning. The hazards of packing my lunch! *facepalm* Hope you have a good rest of the week, and here are a few interesting links I’ve recently dug up…

The wavingest guy in the whole durn state.

Awesome food interactive.

Announcing the end of your marriage on Facebook.

Avocado equations.

Excited to see Leanne Brown on the Forbes 30 under 30 Food and Drink Masters.

This could be a fun reading challenge for 2015!

Guy who thought of genius way to get cheap airfare could be paying the price.

A great resource if you’re grocery shopping for one.

 Aren’t you so glad these gals are friends in real life?

One of my favorite binge watches of all time.

Gorgeous photo styling inspiration.

“Farmer” made me laugh! 

mid-week round-up

fallleaves

Happy Halloween! I hope everyone is having a great week and that you have an appropriately spooky weekend. Here are a few fun links from around the web for your mid-week enjoyment…

Life skills–for anyone, really.

I would love this as a vacation spot!

What really happened to the deceased professor who became the poster-child for exploited academics.

Those little piggy grunts!

Great conversation starter.

22 ways to look at style.

Poor Shane. I’m on his side. : )

If you’re in the market, I LOVE this jewelry shop! Druzy obsessed.

What a proposal!

I would hang a framed print of ANY of these photographs in my house.

Have y’all been listening to this podcast? It’s a nail biter!

Fascinating interview with a former English teacher at a North Korean university.

P.S. Have you seen the show “Manhattan”? I’m 3 episodes in and already totally addicted. The first season is streaming on Hulu Plus, if you’re in need of a new show.

mid-week round-up

oven

What are you up to this week? As you know, I’m still riding high from my recent vacation. I also got to attend Big Blue Madness last Friday and watch the UK Basketball team practice and whatWHAT?! Drake was there! As for this week? I’m excited for all things fall! Walks in cozy sweaters, evening TV marathons with a blanket and a pumpkin candle, I even concocted a pumpkin pie smoothie this weekend that I’m eager to recreate. Isn’t Fall such a gloomy-in-a-good-way season? Sort of nostalgic and broody. I keep thinking of this line from an Andrea Gibson poem…

“Autumn is the hardest season. The leaves are all falling, and they’re
falling like
they’re falling in love with the ground.” 

Anywho, enjoy an appropriately autumnal week, and here are some links for you to enjoy…

Pete Campbell’s tiny home creation.

and speaking of tiny homes–wouldn’t this one make a killer backyard office?

Gorgeous hand-painted bowl.

I love this company and their mission.

This movie, based on a book by Jane Hawking, looks like a must-see.

An important reminder to honor life when everyone is focusing on death.

The first bus session from Nicki Bluhm and The Gramblers (I’m obsessed with their van sessions.)

A quick and easy hair-do tutorial.

Creative batch cooking.

This would totally be my Halloween costume if it wasn’t sold out. : (

Whoopi got there first but still worth a watch, lol.

Very interesting look into the life of a museum professional.