Tag Archives: book list

If You Like That Book, You Might Like This Book || BOOK RECOMMENDATIONS pt. 1

Hi guys! Today, I’d like to offer you a few book recommendations in the form of “if you liked this book, then you might like this other book.” I love when folks on Booktube, Bookstagram, and Goodreads include comparisons to other books in their reviews! It’s one of my favorite ways to find new reads! So, I thought it might be fun and potentially helpful to readers to start a new bookish series here on the blog.

Basically, I’m going to be recommending books that are similar to very popular books that are more well-known. Let’s get into it, shall we?!

If you liked Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel,
you might like Blindness by José Saramago

If you thought Station Eleven was a stunning and powerful portrayal of humanity’s will to survive as a sickness sweeps the land, I think you should check out Blindness. This book stuck with me long after I read the final page. It is haunting and shattering, but honest and compassionate.

Synopsis:

A city is hit by an epidemic of “white blindness” which spares no one. Authorities confine the blind to an empty mental hospital, but there the criminal element holds everyone captive, stealing food rations and raping women. There is one eyewitness to this nightmare who guides seven strangers—among them a boy with no mother, a girl with dark glasses, a dog of tears—through the barren streets, and the procession becomes as uncanny as the surroundings are harrowing. A magnificent parable of loss and disorientation, Blindness has swept the reading public with its powerful portrayal of our worst appetites and weaknesses—and humanity’s ultimately exhilarating spirit.

If you liked The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls,
you might like Priestdaddy by Patricia Lockwood

If you enjoyed reading Jeannette Walls recount her heartbreaking yet oftentimes wacky childhood,  you should check out Patricia Lockwood who also explores how family and tradition shape her identity. Her book is wildly original and her family members are written so vividly they practically leap off the page.

Synopsis:

Father Greg Lockwood is unlike any Catholic priest you have ever met—a man who lounges in boxer shorts, loves action movies, and whose constant jamming on the guitar reverberates “like a whole band dying in a plane crash in 1972.” His daughter is an irreverent poet who long ago left the Church’s country. When an unexpected crisis leads her and her husband to move back into her parents’ rectory, their two worlds collide.

If you liked The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins,
you might like The Woman in the Window by A.J. Finn

If The Girl on the Train made you realize you’re a fan of psychological thrillers with a dash of noir, The Woman in the Window is for you.  It is dazzlingly suspenseful and full of twists that will keep you reading long past bedtime. The movie adaptation starring Amy Adams, Julianne Moore and Gary Oldman is out soon!

Synopsis: 

Anna Fox lives alone—a recluse in her New York City home, unable to venture outside. She spends her day drinking wine (maybe too much), watching old movies, recalling happier times . . . and spying on her neighbors. Then the Russells move into the house across the way: a father, a mother, their teenage son. The perfect family. But when Anna, gazing out her window one night, sees something she shouldn’t, her world begins to crumble—and its shocking secrets are laid bare.

If you liked My Sister, The Serial Killer by Oyinkan Braithwaite,
you might like Queenie by Candice Carty-Williams

Both of these books are witty quick reads that are darkly hilarious but serve up some pretty serious subject matter. While Braithwaite’s book falls more in the thriller category and Queenie is more of a hard-hitting contemporary — they are both disarming, political, and unexpectedly FUNNY.

Synopsis:

Queenie Jenkins is a 25-year-old Jamaican British woman living in London, straddling two cultures and slotting neatly into neither. She works at a national newspaper, where she’s constantly forced to compare herself to her white middle-class peers. After a messy break-up from her white long-term boyfriend, Queenie seeks comfort in all the wrong places…including several hazardous men who do a good job of occupying brain space and a bad job of affirming self-worth.

That was soooooo fun and I can’t wait to bring you round 2! Have you read any of these books? What would you compare them to?

P.S. How to make time for books. 

The Britney Spears Reading List

The Britney Spears reading list

In the year of our lord 2015, I listened to this podcast and became immediately obsessed with the idea of Britney Spears as a reader. In the podcast we learn that Britney read this book. But what other books might she read?

Then, over the next few years, Britney’s Instagram presence became a thing of wonder and true beauty. Those in the know wondered, what in the world would she post next? A minion meme? A Google image searched photo of an ice cream sundae? A goofy skit with her kids? It was truly the gift that kept on giving.

But, amidst the unintentional comedy (truly –what IS this?), it also offered us a rare look into what was going on in this sequestered pop-star’s life…and also, her bookshelves.

So because I am who I am, here are 15 books I found featured on Britney Spears’s Instagram. (Yep, that’s right. I did the scrolling so you don’t have to…although, why wouldn’t you want to scroll through her Instagram? It’s literally amazing.) Ok, here they are …

1. Uglies by Scott Westerfield

2. Ugly Shy Girl by Laura Dockrill

3. The Notebook by Nicholas Sparks

4. Plastic Tulips in the Winter by Denice Vickers

5. The One and Only by Emily Giffin

6. Heart of Miracles by Karen Henson Jones

7. Sex and the City by Candace Bushnell

8. Daring Greatly by Brene Brown

9. Anxious for Nothing by Max Lucado

10. Thrill! by Jackie Collins

11. Wake the Wicked by Christian Baloga

12. Country by Danielle Steel

13. The Goddess Inheritance by Aimee Carter

14. The Four Agreements by Don Miguel Ruiz

15. Astrology for the Soul by Jan Spiller

Feel free to borrow from this list whenever you find yourself asking WWBSR? aka What would Britney Spears read?

I mean, just look at this happy creature channeling Belle from Beauty and the Beast! …and then also eating a pyramid of fried rice? Idk, you guys. But I’m here for it because I think it encompasses how much Brit loves and appreciates life’s simple pleasures. And what’s a better simple pleasure than getting lost in a good book? Happy reading!

*Pirouettes away while singing “Work Bitch” but replacing all the work’s with “read”*

P.S. The @britneyspears account literally contains multitudes — so yes, I’ve also created a workout inspired by it too.

Book Club: I Have Chosen to Stay and Fight Pt. 4

Books written by comedians is such a fun genre, don’t you think? They’re usually conversational, quick reads, and of course laugh-out-loud entertaining. So in honor of Margaret Cho, I thought it might be neat to share a few other books by comedians!

Yes Please by Amy Poehler

In her first book, one of our most beloved funny folk delivers a smart, pointed, and ultimately inspirational read. Full of the comedic skill that makes us all love Amy, Yes Please is a rich and varied collection of stories, lists, poetry (Plastic Surgery Haiku, to be specific), photographs, mantras and advice. With chapters like “Treat Your Career Like a Bad Boyfriend,” “Plain Girl Versus the Demon” and “The Robots Will Kill Us All” Yes Please will make you think as much as it will make you laugh. Honest, personal, real, and righteous, Yes Please is full of words to live by.

Modern Romance by Aziz Ansari

At some point, every one of us embarks on a journey to find love. We meet people, date, get into and out of relationships, all with the hope of finding someone with whom we share a deep connection. This seems standard now, but it’s wildly different from what people did even just decades ago. Single people today have more romantic options than at any point in human history. With technology, our abilities to connect with and sort through these options are staggering. So why are so many people frustrated?

Bossypants by Tina Fey

Before Liz Lemon, before “Weekend Update,” before “Sarah Palin,” Tina Fey was just a young girl with a dream: a recurring stress dream that she was being chased through a local airport by her middle-school gym teacher. She also had a dream that one day she would be a comedian on TV. She has seen both these dreams come true.

Sick in the Head by Judd Apatow

From the writer and director of Knocked Up and the producer of Freaks and Geeks comes a collection of intimate, hilarious conversations with the biggest names in comedy from the past thirty years—including Mel Brooks, Jerry Seinfeld, Jon Stewart, Sarah Silverman, Harold Ramis, Seth Rogen, Chris Rock, and Lena Dunham.

The Bedwetter by Sarah Silverman

From the outrageously filthy and oddly innocent comedienne and star of the powerful 2015 film I Smile Back  comes a memoir—her first book—that is at once shockingly personal, surprisingly poignant, and still pee-in-your-pants funny.

Dad is Fat by Jim Gaffigan 

Though he grew up in a large Irish-Catholic family, Jim was satisfied with the nomadic, nocturnal life of a standup comedian, and was content to be “that weird uncle who lives in an apartment by himself in New York that everyone in the family speculates about.” But all that changed when he married and found out his wife, Jeannie “is someone who gets pregnant looking at babies.”

***

Which have you read? I’ve read Yes Please, Bossypants, and Dad is Fat, and the others are on my list! Do you like reading books by comedians? Let me know in the comments below!

Speaking of… If you haven’t read I Have Chosen to Stay and Fight yet, but it’s on your list, you can order it HERE or check it out from your local library. These posts will be here for you at any time — 

Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 |

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For the love of BOOKS!

What have you been reading lately? While I believe ALL seasons are great for reading, Fall weather feels especially conducive. Don’t you think? There’s something so lovely about curling up on the couch because, hey, it’s already dark outside…but in reality you still have plenty of hours ’til bedtime.

I think Anne, of Green Gables fame, said it best —

“I’m so glad I live in a world where there are Octobers.”

Sad to see October go. But so excited for what books lay ahead in November! If you’re in the same boat, here are some books I’ve read recently that I’d recommend for next month’s evening couch sessions:

Sharp Objects
Delancey
Honeymoon in Purdah
Under the Banner of Heaven
All the Light We Cannot See
The Vacationers
Some Girls
Confessions of a Prairie Bitch

I’m currently reading The Silver Star, which is written by the same person who wrote The Glass Castle. My friend recently recommended Nevada (I added it to my reading list right away), and my mom and sister both LOVED The Electric Woman. Also, I recently saw someone perform an amazing oral interpretation of a story from Her Body and Other Parties, which totally made me want to reread.

So, what are YOU reading? Anything you’ve read in the last few years that you can’t stop recommending to people? Would love to hear!!

P.S. How to make time for books.

mid-week round-up

arch door

Happy Wednesday! What have you been doing this week? I just got back last night from a whirl-wind trip to Tampa, by way of train, to see my sister’s musical. She not only rocked the stage as the leading lady but she also wrote the whole thing! I was so proud. And it was great to see her and my mom. We got to enjoy some lovely catch-up time over coffee and brunch. The journey was super fun, too. I find train travel so much more relaxing than airplanes. And way more leg room! Have you traveled by train recently? Hope you have a lovely week, and enjoy the following round-up of links…

The case for the 6-hour work day.

Why are students still required to buy Texas Instruments graphing calculators?

Auto-pilot cooking.

Sometimes we need poetry’s raw imagery to help us understand.

Women in Tech.

The “prettiest bride” in China.

Tons of material for a Miami book-club.

Swooning over the pages of this Bullet Journal.

Perfect white + gold desk accessory.

Which would you choose? (I like the pineapple and Kevin from Home Alone!)

How magical!

The truth about baby carrots.