Tag Archives: backpacking

How Much Can I Fit in the Nomatic Compression Cube?

The one item that has changed my travel game the most? Packing cubes. Seriously, if you’ve never used one of these space saving devices…do yourself a favor! Since making this life-changing discovery, I’ve tried a few different kinds. But today, I’d like to put the NOMATIC COMPRESSION CUBE to the test. Let’s see what I can stuff inside!

The NOMATIC COMPRESSION CUBE is made of rip-stop nylon so it is super durable and strong. What sets it apart from the other cubes I’ve tried is that it has two compartments. Not only that, there’s an extra zipper in the middle that helps compress everything down! The double compartment could be useful for a few different things — keeping dirty and clean clothes separate, organizing by type of clothes, or even a side per person if you’re a super minimal couple!

When the packing cube is full it is about 5 1/2 inches tall. However, by zipping the central perimeter zipper, that number can shrink down by about 2 inches! What?! The overall size of the cube is roughly 10 1/2 by 8 inches. For perspective, I have PURSES bigger than that!

Let’s pack some stuff up!

I tried to include some bulkier items that I might not normally take if I was one-bag traveling — like heavy duty yoga pants and jammy pants.

Here’s what I fit inside:

1 sundress
1 button down shirt
1 pair of yoga pants
2 t-shirts
1 pair of denim shorts
1 set of jammies (t-shirt and pants)
3 pairs of underwear
and 1 pair of ankle socks

The middle zipper is what makes it a compression cube!

Now for the most important question! Does it fit in my Tom Bihn Synapse 19

My hope was that it would sit at the bottom of the bag like this!

Success! (You could honestly stack two in there!)

Look at all that room! Plenty of space for my laptop, another packing cube (or two!) and a toiletry bag. Plus, all the other pockets of the Tom Bihn are free for other goodies. If I were packing for an actual trip (instead of just experimenting), I would probably use the NOMATIC for everyday clothes (maybe tops on one side and bottoms on the other?) and use a smaller packing cube for underwear, socks, jammies, and workout clothes. Which would mean I could fit A LOT of outfits in a NINETEEN LITER bag.

Final verdict – This is a fantastic packing cube for smaller backpacks! The compression zipper really does a lot to bring the bulk down and double sides is super handy. This little baby holds a LOT!

ORDER YOUR OWN NOMATIC COMPRESSION CUBE HERE. 

P.S. Read some other TRAVEL posts from FINDING DELIGHT:
Heroclip Review
Great YouTube Channel for Travel Inspo
7 Travel Tips for Airports & Planes

Advertisements

Book Club: In Pursuit of Female Road Narratives Pt. 3

book-club

Our journey towards discovering a positive female road narrative is almost complete. The summit is on the horizon! If you’d like to catch up, you can learn more about the lack of this particular literary genre here, get the book here and participate in some extended watching here. Today, I’d like to bring you some extended reading in the form of articles, interviews and blogs, as well as some book recommendations to keep you moving forward in our quest towards setting the precedent for women on the road to appear in American literature in a heroic light.

whatpath

Arguments for solo travel–

Why Women Should Travel Alone by Koty Neelis

A Journey to the Center of Your Self by Veronica Chambers

…and the inspiring Wikipedia page of Ida Laura Pfeiffer; Austrian, solo female round-the-world explorer and travel writer. (For those of you who enjoy going down the Wikipedia rabbit hole!)

CherylStrayedMonster

In the words of Cheryl Strayed–

An Interview: On “Binge Writing,” Doling out Advice, and Finding Clarity by Jenn Godbout (“Write like a motherf*cker.” <3)

The Love of My Life  by Cheryl Strayed from the September 2002 issue of The Sun Magazine

bookcollage

Books to continue our journey–

Fantasy Novel ~ Swamplandia by Karen Russell

Appalachian Trail Thru Hike Memoir ~ Becoming Odyssa by Jennifer Pharr Davis

Cultural and Anthropological Exploration ~ Four Corners by Kira Salak 

hikingblogmountain

Blog obsessed–

Pacific Crest Trail ~ Dorothy’s Thru-Hike Journal 

Appalachian Trail ~ An Extraordinary Hike (this solo female hiker did not summit Mt. Katahdin but I still think her blog is an awesome account of a lady setting off on her own and a powerful example that our journeys don’t always lead to our intended destinations.)

Lady Travel ~ Her Packing List

cherylauthor

Other books by Ms. Strayed–

Tiny Beautiful Things: Advice on Love and Life from Dear Sugar

Torch 

~~~

Next week I will be writing a final review of “Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail” by Cheryl Strayed. 

AND…

all this reading and research about travel and hiking, along with the smell of Spring in the air, has me itching for a hiking trip. Do you have any trail recommendations? Long or short, near or far–I’d love to hear! 

Book Club: In Pursuit of Female Road Narratives Pt. 2

book-club

As we continue on our literary journey, hiking alongside Cheryl Strayed in Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail, I’d like to bring you some extra material and hopefully  extend your pursuit of the female road narrative beyond the confines of Strayed’s pages. Admittedly, I can fall down the rabbit hole on a lot of subjects but I think doing so in an attempt to provide a more holistic reading experience is a worthy plummet. Along the way I’ve raised some points for you to ponder and meditate on. Let’s jump right in!

More with Cheryl Strayed

Besides some online written reviews, the first press I heard about “Wild” and Strayed’s journey was on one of my favorite radio shows, Q with Jian Ghomeshi. Here, Jian asks some poignant and thoughtful questions…

FOOD FOR THOUGHT: Would you hike the Pacific Crest Trail? What do you think Cheryl means when she says she “writes in the company of fear and I’m used to it”? 

Cheryl delivers a lovely TEDTalk on Radical Sincerity and explains, “our deepest treasures are buried in the crappy detritus of our life.” This idea was glaringly apparent to me with each passing chapter of her story and reiterated here. What I found so compelling throughout “Wild,” and perhaps you’re picking up on this through the pages as well, was how her physical pain throughout the hike served as a larger metaphor for her emotional pain, so much so, that it became unclear where one ended and the other began. And this is true in her speech here as well. It’s as if she could be talking about hiking 1100 miles or losing her mother at 22 or both…and for some reason I find that so beautiful.

“It was the most heroic thing I had ever done and that suffering was the greatest suffered…Carrying this weight I couldn’t bear; I bore it. Couldn’t live in a world without my mother; I was living in one.” 

FOOD FOR THOUGHT: What is the most heroic thing you have ever done? Was it physical or emotional?

Setting off into the great unknown as a woman doesn’t have to be scary, it can be empowering. (Plus, Oprah insists she just got a cellphone. *side eye*)

FOOD FOR THOUGHT: What is the longest stretch of time you’ve spent alone? 

Cinematic Renderings of the Female Journey

When reflecting on on-screen odysseys of the feminine nature there are a few forms that come to mind:

Traveling home (NOW)…or with your peers for protection (THEN)…

To escape…when you’re “in trouble”…

When the trail eventually leads to a man…

I’ve watched these movies (multiple times each) and I’m drawn to these journeys and stories, too. Yet, I recognize that these can’t be the only paths. Surely there are other, unpaved roads for we women to pave…and movies we can make about the process. : )

FOOD FOR THOUGHT: What film journeys come to mind when you think about a woman on the road? Do they fall into these categories? Why do you think these particular narratives are more palatable to us? 

Possible Paths

Perhaps you are like me and “Wild” has struck a cord on more counts than just acting as a positive example of a female road narrative. Perhaps, you too have dreams of backpacking far off lands and long distance hiking.

To watch some kick-ass, back-packin’ the world, travelin’ expert ladies; I would recommend checking out the travel show Globe Trekker here. If you’re not feelin’ paying to watch the episodes, I’ve checked out many Globe Trekker DVDs at my local libraries and I think it comes on PBS2 if you got channels and such. They travel all around the world and highlight tips for solo travel. Great for a hearty dose of wanderlust.

To watch some kids KILLIN’ IT on the Appalachian Trail check out this. These three hiked the length of the AT and made 31 awesome webisodes documenting their journey. Their silliness and spirit was moving and inspiring. I hope to tackle future hardships by taking a page from their book–always laughing, humbled by the beauty of nature, drawing on the strength of community and love. Once you watch their first update you’ll probably accidentally binge watch them all…so, sorry about that.

FOOD FOR THOUGHT: If you could write a road narrative into being RIGHT NOW, what would that journey look like? Where would the road lead?

“I hope you keep walking.” ~Cheryl Strayed