Tag Archives: movies

mid-week round-up

We’re headed out on our first of two holiday road trips later this week, and I’m super excited to bundle up in the car and head out. (Hope Chet is down to listen to Christmas music and true crime podcasts the whole way!) We’re seeing family, and I’m looking forward to eating some favorite foods and stopping by for a stroll through a holiday lights display. Also, I hope you’ll check out this year’s holiday gift guides; I always love putting them together for you guys. Hope you have a great rest of your week, and here are some links for your Wednesday enjoyment…

If someone surprised me with one of these (filled with childhood photos), I might burst into tears.

The Confederacy was built on slavery. How can so many Southern whites still believe otherwise?

Great inspo for delighting customers.

Only after she was shot did the author of this article begin to understand America’s complicated relationship with guns.

Hidden in L.A. suburbia, wrenching poverty preys on children and destroys dreams.

Reliving my childhood aka talking about Saved by the Bell.

The lady hero’s journey.

[Related: In Pursuit of Female Road Narratives]

The inventor of iPhone autocorrect says, “Sorry about that, and you’re welcome.”

The best movies of 2018 according to The New Yorker.

4 women get a haircut they never thought they’d get.

Don’t know if I love or hate this, lol.

Take 40% Off Your First Month with code HOLIDAY40 at ScentBox.com! Valid 12/10-12/14

P.S. A few Finding Delight posts  you may have missed — My Favorite Websites and Blogs and Book Review: The Binding Chair.

Advertisements

mid-week round-up

Hope everyone has a wonderful Thanksgiving! In honor of the holiday, I’ve rounded up some Thanksgiving content…

A Thanksgiving capsule wardrobe.

Wines to enjoy at Thanksgiving.

A Thanksgiving menu for under $50.

Dollar Tree DIY table centerpiece.

Movies for the whole family.

Gratitude journal.

Recipe for cheesy cauliflower.

Getting your car road-trip ready.

And a few other links you might enjoy…

Obsessed with Roxane Gay’s Goodreads account.

The untold stories of the housing crisis.

The future of aging just might be in Margaritaville.

Actually really looking forward to this movie.

Made me laugh!

Have a wonderful Thanksgiving and see you next week!! xoxo

mid-week round-up

What have you been up to, my loves? Over the weekend, Chet and I drove around some nearby areas we’d yet to explore and enjoyed lunch on the Tennessee River. The weather was so beautiful and it was so nice to get out and it explore. There are so many little hidden gems to see and do! Now I’ve got work projects on the brain until next weekend. *le sigh* But hopefully squeezing in a bit of yard work, too! Hope y’all are having a wonderful week, and here are a few things I’ve rounded up for ya…

These lunch ladies stole half a million dollars!

Learning how to dress in your 30’s as a woman

Related: My Latest Le Tote

This Brooklyn apartment was inspired by movies from the 1990’s.

You don’t owe anyone an interaction.

Check out CreativeLive’s 50 Basics Under $50.

On Irishness, immigration, and race.

Related: Maeve in America by Maeve Higgins

How to deliver a pep talk that’s actually motivating.

The best coming-of-age movies.

Do you think these work?

Don’t let the title scare you away!

After the mosquitoes went away.

What stretching actually does to your body.

From now, through September, BLUME is offering 25% off ALL orders (including subscriptions) with coupon code BACK2SCHOOL.

P.S. A few Finding Delight posts you may have missed — 9 Activities to Break Up the Day When You’re Working From Home and A Social Media Manager Shares a Day in Her Life.

mid-week round-up

Happy Valentine’s Day!!! I hope you all are having a love-filled day! How are you celebrating the holiday? Of course today is the middle of the week so must of us are spending the day working. But do you have anything special planned? Chet and I are having a nice dinner at home and will exchange a few surprises. (Eeee!) But for now, here are some links you may want to peruse…

How much an out gay Olympian could mean to a kid now—or to a 34-year-old who’s been waiting for it his whole life.

Related: Winter Olympics Netflix Marathon

A glimpse at Appalachia’s feminist protest music.

This bedroom wall is so magical!

The easiest crusty bread recipe ever. Yum!

My trusty (and super cheap) mini backpack has about had it. Should I upgrade?

Related: Backpacks make for happy backs. ❤

A new report finds that slavery is mistaught and often sentimentalized—and students are alarmingly misinformed as a result.

Small wonder that films about female friendships have traditionally fared so poorly with critics. Look who’s writing the reviews.

Related: Rules for Female Friendship

More and more Americans experience eviction, and gentrification is partly to blame.

Related: Slum Lords aka The Hell of Renting

A brief history of how women got tricked into shaving.

Should I do 100 squats every day for 30 days?

Related: How to Make Your Own Fitness Challenge

Are Busy Phillip’s IG stories making anyone else want to get a rebounder?

Finally, if you have Le Tote, they are having an AMAZING end of season sale. (And if you don’t have Le Tote, you should sign up. <-use that link and get your first tote on me. Seriously!)

P.S. A few Finding Delight posts you may have missed — Weekend Uniforms and The Reading Habits Tag.

mid-week round-up

dandelion blowing

What are you up to this week? I had an amazing long weekend complete with sunshine, shopping trips, and even got to see my brother who was up from Savannah for a wedding. (The highlight was definitely this sandwich, though!) I’m excited for next weekend and what adventures it may hold! Oh, and if you’re in the area, drop by Good Foods Co-op this Friday…it’s our Kick Off Summer Event and it’s sure to be a spectacular time (as always!). Hope you have a good week, and now here are the links…

The price of nice nails. 

Food lessons from India.

What to cook in a drought.

Last minute take-along to your next pot-luck.

Brits react to American culture.

Genius invention.

Do you have attachment issues?

Packing tips for a city getaway!

No crying in baseball! Ok, maybe just a little…

New documentary reveals the artist under the feathers.

Genius empathy cards.

In case you’re planning a trip!

(Drought recipe article via Adam.)

mid-week round-up

divingboard

Hello all! I hope everyone is having a marvelous Wednesday. I have grand plans to take a long walk (rain or shine), clean my bathroom, and make a pitcher of delicious iced tea. I’m also blazing my way through Lisa Bloom’s Suspicion Nation: The Inside Story of the Trayvon Martin Injustice and Why We Continue to Repeat It. It’s been on my reading list since it came out earlier this summer (I ❤ Lisa Bloom) but felt especially timely and necessary to read NOW. What are your plans?

Oh, and don’t forget if you hop over to THIS POST and leave a comment, you’ll be entered to win a new product that my cat, Wink, and I have found quite helpful. Go check it out!

A fabulous place to vacation in Maryland.

I am such a sucker for pictures of abandoned places.

About to start Season 4 of The Wire. Omar is my favorite character.

A round-up of easy, summer recipes.

Speaking of round-ups…BOOKS!

I. can. not. wait!!! Propaganda posters from The Capitol. *whistles mockingjay call*

Keeping it really real in terms of our social media addiction.

Does your outfit influence the outcome of a first date?

Dear Miley Cyrus, Keep doing EXACTLY what you’re doing.

This is one of the truths I hold most dear: Adults need recess, too!

Head nurse at Emory on why Ebola patients were brought to the U.S. 

Where my “Gilmore Girls” fans at?

Thanks for stopping by!!! xoxo

Netflix recommendations.

What to watch after a tough day at work…

Drinking Buddies

Why I loved it:

– If you, like me, work in the company of hipsters everyday; you will recognize every character.

– The entire film was improvised! WHUT?!

– Pairs so perfectly with a 6-pack of West 6th beer.

– Admit it: Mumblecore is just so damn relatable.

20 Feet From Stardom

Why I loved it:

– It takes a village to create awe-inspiring, catchy, successful music.

– The Academy certainly liked it. (This film won the 2013 Oscar for Best Documentary.)

– Merry Clayton Radio has become a go-to Pandora station.

– Don’t we all, sometimes, feel like the Claudia Lennear to someone elses Mick Jagger?

What have you been watching on the ‘flix lately? Movies are one of my favorite ways to unwind! 

Book Club: In Pursuit of WHY it Gets Better Pt. 2

This month in the Finding delight. virtual book club we’re traveling back to the world of cliques and cafeterias with the help of Alexandra Robbins’ journalistic prowess in The Geeks Shall Inherit the Earth: Popularity, Quirk Theory and Why Outsiders Thrive After High School. This week, I’ve found some extended watching–in the way of interviews, movies and other internet gems–to help us nail down the answer to our over-arching questions: Why do things get better once you’ve taken off that high school cap and gown? How did our own differences suddenly elevate our social experience when before they felt so demoralizing? Check out the videos and review the questions raised throughout this post…remember, we’re traveling back to high school here so there may or may not be a test. ; )

More with Alexandra Robbins

An interview with the author herself in which she discusses why cliques are so prevalent, how schools help instead of hinder the teenage social hierarchy and what parents can do to dissuade their kids from feeling like social outcasts…

What would you tell a high schooler today if they confessed they feel flawed for not fitting into the social in-crowd? 

Robbins delivers a quick PSA on why “You’ve got to be proud to be an outsider.” She rattles off a laundry list of now famous individuals who identified with the outsider label as children or young adults. Now that I’m far enough into “Geeks” to feel like I really know the youth Robbins follows for a year, I have begun to recognize the qualities in their teenage selves that really COULD set them apart as adults. In this video, Robbins talks about Taylor Swift being ostracized in middle school for her intense love of country music. Similarly, the outsiders have qualities which will no doubt put them ahead of the pack in terms of employment, relationships and all sorts of social standing metrics.

Being different makes you awesome and some day people are gonna appreciate you for who you really are.” 

What qualities do you exhibit which exemplify Robbins’ “quirk theory”? Can you think of more examples of individuals who went from outsider to success story?

And just for fun, here is Alexandra Robbins on The Colbert Report discussing another book she wrote about high schoolers–The Overachievers: The Secret Lives of Driven Kids.

How do you think this quest for academic success/college acceptance as end goal affects social inclusion/exclusion? 

Cinematic Renderings of the High School Experience

My top 5 favorite “High School Movies”:

1. Ferris Bueller’s Day off

2. 10 Things I Hate About You

3. The Breakfast Club

4. Mean Girls

5. crazy/beautiful

 

And if you have a lot of time on your hands just watch all of Friday Night Lights!

What do these films get right about the high school experience? What do they get wrong? What’s your favorite movie about high school? Is there a movie that shaped your own teenage experience simply because it was about teens and you watched it WHILE you were a teen? #meta 

Remembering the Past/Help the Future

In the end, this book strikes a cord with so many because we’ve all been there. While it may be easier to come out the other side and benefit from “quirk theory,” I’d like to challenge you to peek back through that tunnel at the person you were. Have an old VHS tape of a choir competition? Watch it. Did you keep a journal full of poetry and essays? Read it. Look through old photo albums, class assignments, defunct for a decade Livejournals. This little trip down Nostalgia Boulevard could hold valuable information for how you interact with struggling teenagers in the future. It’s easy to put the past behind us and just say “Yeah, high school sucks but it gets better.” But a more concrete answer can be a lot more enlightening. After my own excavation of high school artifacts I’ve found this example: Yes, it was crazy weird that I felt the need to deliver a rather dramatic monologue for a talent show Fall semester of my freshman year of high school. Considering all the popular kids treated speaking in public like a joke and were more focused on sports than spotlights, this was in-crowd suicide. Yet, fast forward four years and speaking in public would get me into college and earn me all kinds of resume boosting awards. Fast forward four more and things like job interviews and work-place negotiations feel like no big deal. With the clarity of over a decade’s removal from that example I can see the difference between me and the in-crowd, in that instance, was bravery.

And now that we’ve isolated some of the things which made us unique in high school and thought of concrete examples for “quirk theory” in our own lives, the final extended watching I would like you to do is….real life, current high schoolers. Go support some kids. As I’ve said before, the school system is doing everything it can to support exclusion by putting certain kids, groups and extracurriculars on a pedestal. Let’s strive to counteract this trend by building up the kids who are different in similar ways to our high school selves. Judge a speech tournament. Go to a play. Buy a piece of art. Donate to a gaming club. Speak at schools about your job. Coach something. Volunteer. Talk to kids about their interests. Cheer for the marching band. Got more ideas? Leave ’em below! I think we can all commit to doing one of these things this month. : ) Let’s do it! 

If you could write a letter to your high school self what would it say? If you could sit down with one group of kids and READ them your letter to yourself who would they be?

 Dear Mr. Vernon, we accept the fact that we had to sacrifice a whole Saturday in detention for whatever it was we did wrong. But we think you’re crazy to make us write an essay telling you who we think we are. You see us as you want to see us – in the simplest terms, in the most convenient definitions. But what we found out is that each one of us is a brain…and an athlete…and a basket case…a princess…and a criminal…Does that answer your question? 

~The Breakfast Club~ 

 

Book Club: In Pursuit of Female Road Narratives Pt. 2

book-club

As we continue on our literary journey, hiking alongside Cheryl Strayed in Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail, I’d like to bring you some extra material and hopefully  extend your pursuit of the female road narrative beyond the confines of Strayed’s pages. Admittedly, I can fall down the rabbit hole on a lot of subjects but I think doing so in an attempt to provide a more holistic reading experience is a worthy plummet. Along the way I’ve raised some points for you to ponder and meditate on. Let’s jump right in!

More with Cheryl Strayed

Besides some online written reviews, the first press I heard about “Wild” and Strayed’s journey was on one of my favorite radio shows, Q with Jian Ghomeshi. Here, Jian asks some poignant and thoughtful questions…

FOOD FOR THOUGHT: Would you hike the Pacific Crest Trail? What do you think Cheryl means when she says she “writes in the company of fear and I’m used to it”? 

Cheryl delivers a lovely TEDTalk on Radical Sincerity and explains, “our deepest treasures are buried in the crappy detritus of our life.” This idea was glaringly apparent to me with each passing chapter of her story and reiterated here. What I found so compelling throughout “Wild,” and perhaps you’re picking up on this through the pages as well, was how her physical pain throughout the hike served as a larger metaphor for her emotional pain, so much so, that it became unclear where one ended and the other began. And this is true in her speech here as well. It’s as if she could be talking about hiking 1100 miles or losing her mother at 22 or both…and for some reason I find that so beautiful.

“It was the most heroic thing I had ever done and that suffering was the greatest suffered…Carrying this weight I couldn’t bear; I bore it. Couldn’t live in a world without my mother; I was living in one.” 

FOOD FOR THOUGHT: What is the most heroic thing you have ever done? Was it physical or emotional?

Setting off into the great unknown as a woman doesn’t have to be scary, it can be empowering. (Plus, Oprah insists she just got a cellphone. *side eye*)

FOOD FOR THOUGHT: What is the longest stretch of time you’ve spent alone? 

Cinematic Renderings of the Female Journey

When reflecting on on-screen odysseys of the feminine nature there are a few forms that come to mind:

Traveling home (NOW)…or with your peers for protection (THEN)…

To escape…when you’re “in trouble”…

When the trail eventually leads to a man…

I’ve watched these movies (multiple times each) and I’m drawn to these journeys and stories, too. Yet, I recognize that these can’t be the only paths. Surely there are other, unpaved roads for we women to pave…and movies we can make about the process. : )

FOOD FOR THOUGHT: What film journeys come to mind when you think about a woman on the road? Do they fall into these categories? Why do you think these particular narratives are more palatable to us? 

Possible Paths

Perhaps you are like me and “Wild” has struck a cord on more counts than just acting as a positive example of a female road narrative. Perhaps, you too have dreams of backpacking far off lands and long distance hiking.

To watch some kick-ass, back-packin’ the world, travelin’ expert ladies; I would recommend checking out the travel show Globe Trekker here. If you’re not feelin’ paying to watch the episodes, I’ve checked out many Globe Trekker DVDs at my local libraries and I think it comes on PBS2 if you got channels and such. They travel all around the world and highlight tips for solo travel. Great for a hearty dose of wanderlust.

To watch some kids KILLIN’ IT on the Appalachian Trail check out this. These three hiked the length of the AT and made 31 awesome webisodes documenting their journey. Their silliness and spirit was moving and inspiring. I hope to tackle future hardships by taking a page from their book–always laughing, humbled by the beauty of nature, drawing on the strength of community and love. Once you watch their first update you’ll probably accidentally binge watch them all…so, sorry about that.

FOOD FOR THOUGHT: If you could write a road narrative into being RIGHT NOW, what would that journey look like? Where would the road lead?

“I hope you keep walking.” ~Cheryl Strayed

Winter Olympics Netflix Marathon

winter olympics netflix marathon

What’s that you say? You’re going through olympic withdrawals already? Well, now that you’re a winter sport enthusiast and aficionado, here are six films to get you through the last of these winter nights without Bob Costas and his crunk eye.

1. Lindsey Vonn: In the Moment

skiinglindsey

This little piece about skier and Olympian Lindsey Vonn was a bit self aggrandizing. It spends a lot of time trying to convince the audience how humble and hard-working Lindsey is. We’re meant to be quite touched by how loyal Lindsey is to her fans and how she will spend hours signing autographs because she wants to be a hero to children just like Picabo Street was a hero to her. So that’s fine…but honestly kind of boring. Really the things I took away from this docu-special were: 1. Lindsey trains like a beast and sometimes eats nine hard-boiled eggs after going hard at the gym. Literally, there’s a scene where she just gets down on egg after egg after egg. That scene alone convinced me of skier’s athleticism. 2. Lindsey wears lots of eye makeup even on the slopes. I don’t really have an opinion on this cosmetic choice it just struck me as something I needed to mention. 3. If I had a husband who was also my ski coach I would murder him. Especially if this husband used to be a famous skier but now is a has-been and is living vicariously through me every damn day and video-taping all my runs and making me watch them with him while he comments and I’m just trying to catch my breath from performing crazy feats of strength and gravity-defiance…nope, I would have NO patience for that, none whatsoever.

2. The Price of Gold

nancytonya

I can not recommend this documentary enough. If you were alive during the 1994 Olympics you will want to see this in depth account of the Tonya Harding/Nancy Kerrigan story. Their drama occurred, for me, at the peak of my interest in figure skating, so every subsequent story about them ranked high on the list of news I cared about. Theirs is the classic “competitive women” story we will always be drawn in by; the Betty and Veronica, White Swan and Black Swan, Madonna and Whore. This saga is compelling, as one interviewee explains, because it is “so rich in it’s black and whites.” The documentary features some never before seen home footage of the Harding family. This fascinating reel shows Tonya’s mom in a disgustingly cluttered home clad in a fur coat with a bird on her shoulder. Read that sentence again and tell me you’re not interested?? So Grey Gardens!!! The film goes on to cover the fateful knee clubbing but it was the coverage of the weeks after that I found more interesting–the time between Nancy’s injury and the ‘94 Olympics. The Olympic committee allowed injured Nancy on to the team so both she and Tonya were in hardcore training. The difference in their training was striking. Tonya trained at a public rink in the middle of the mall and the press was EVERYWHERE, hounding her there and at home and on the street. There’s even a shot of Diane Sawyer just chillin’ rink-side, waiting to ask Tonya a thing or two as well as paparazzi setting off her truck’s security alarm so she would have to show her face. It looked like absolute mayhem. Meanwhile, Nancy is recovering and training totally shut off from the outside world. Most notable aspect of this part of the film, however, is that in one scene Tonya is wearing a big white sweatshirt that reads “No Comment”–perfection. God, I love the 90’s. And speaking of clothes, did you know Nancy skated at the public Olympics practice (the one EVERYONE was at because she was on the ice WITH Tonya) in the dress she was wearing when she was attacked? Who was her PR person? A genius, that’s who. In the end, we all know how the story went–Nancy skated a gold medal performance but ended up with the silver. The world had to keep America in check for being goddamn lunatics all the time. And that is why the Olympics is awesome and keeps bringin’ people back. But, keep watching! At about 7 minutes and 30 seconds left, Tonya Harding breaks down and delivers a monologue that is GOLD MEDAL material. It’s possible you will shed a tear for her, the villain of our childhoods. If you like this documentary, and I promise you will, keep your eye out for the theatrical adaptation of the Tonya and Nancy story coming to an off-broadway stage and duo final near you. Co-authored by yours truly and Katie Berger, it’s gonna be game-changing.

3. Ice Castles

icecastles

Mk, this is basically a Lifetime/Hallmark channel made for TV remake of an old movie about a figure skater who goes blind. It was fine noise to have in the background while I did some work. Occasionally I looked up for the actual skating scenes because the lead girl DOES land some pretty legit jumps. But in all honesty she doesn’t go blind until like over an hour in so *yawn*. I went into this with high hopes because, as I’ve said before, I love when blindness throws a wrench in a sports-movie plot. See also: Wild Hearts Can’t Be Broken. There just wasn’t enough blindness in this movie for my taste.

4. The Other Side of the Mountain

theothersideofthemountain

Dude, I don’t know what it is about movies from the 70’s but they never disappoint for me. Something about the scores and sound effects is so gripping, like they knew they were somewhat lacking in terms of visual artistry and so they make up for it through sound. Not to mention that I covet all the outfits in 70’s flicks. This film is based on the true story of skiing champion Jill Kinmont and the accident she had during an Olympic-qualifying tournament which left her paralyzed from the neck down. You go into the movie knowing she’s gonna take a tumble so I’m not giving any spoilers when I say, the moment of her career ending fall off the mountain caused me to audibly gasp. The score works perfectly in step with the dramatic arcs of the story and there’s even an awesome non-skiing side-plot about Jill teaching on an Indian reservation that I happened to really like. Beau Bridges is totally my new celebrity crush in this movie. He is so charming and funny and such a weirdo! Also of note, I’m currently very interested in the history of medicine so seeing rehabilitative practices from the 50’s for quadriplegia, even fictional cinematic renderings of these practices, was personally interesting to me. I would call  this movie a cross between Love Story, The Shining, and Heidi…just trust me, that’s a good thing.

5. Horgasm: A Love Story

torstein

Short and sweet, this docu showcases some wicked snowboarding scenes while highlighting the day-to-day life and career of Norwegian snowboarder Torstein Horgmo. At times, it tries a little too hard for the look of an MTV special or Jackass movie. Probably one of the more random things I’ve ever watched on the ‘flix but I certainly didn’t hate it.

6. Chalet Girl

chaletgirl

British Rom-Com starring Felicity Jones, Ed Westwick and Bill Nighy. Face it, if this came on cable you would accidentally get sucked in and watch the whole damn thing, so you may as well tuck in and enjoy! (Notice I said “tuck in”…I pick up regionalisms very quickly.)

Enjoy! Sports movies are basically my third favorite genre. Do you have a favorite that I should put in my queue?