Tag Archives: women in the workplace

Ways To Excel In A Male-Dominated Work Place

For many young women, making it in the professional world means learning to work in a male-dominated industry. Whether you work in investment banking, tech, or the auto industry, there are some practical tips to help you thrive and excel, even as the only woman in the office.

* This post may contain affiliate links.

Use Your Voice

Unfortunately, a lot of bosses are too busy to figure out what the fairest project allocation is, so it often comes down to who shouts the loudest about the new deal or partnership. Don’t let the men in the room be the only ones to pipe up. If you aren’t good at grabbing your boss when you spot them in the kitchen and bringing up the upcoming projects that excite you, then schedule in some more formal time at least once a month to check in and tell your boss what you want to work on. Whether you want to work with a new client or tackle that new project that will let you use your skills learned from https://www.drdrone.ca/, let your boss know. 

Don’t Take on Extra Errands

Women are often treated like someone’s assistant, even if they’re not. Remember that you don’t often see successful folks picking up their boss’s coffee, so you shouldn’t do it either. If everyone takes it in turns to do the coffee run, or you’re already going out to pick up your own lunch and can collect someone else’s at the same time this is fine, but don’t let yourself always be the one who gets sent out on errands like this. 

Don’t Be A Yes Woman

In many industries, there is often real pressure to work hard and keep your workload overflowing. It can be very easy to say yes to every project in an effort to be a good employee, but if you never say no, then you will just hurt yourself and your company. It’s important to stand up for projects that you really want to work on and push back when you don’t have the capacity. Plenty of the men will be saying no, and you should too. 

Play To Your Strengths

Some women make the mistake of pushing away from traditionally ‘feminine’ skills in a male-dominated work environment, even if those are the things they’re really good at. If you’re good at reading people’s feelings, for example, don’t shy away from it. Instead, use this skill to benefit you. Give your boss a live read of how his team is feeling, and use that to get more senior exposure. Whether it’s listening, emotional aptitude, empathy, or socializing, if you have these strengths, you should play to them. These are good qualities to demonstrate as a future leader, especially in a workplace where those skills are in short supply.

Get A Sponsor

A sponsor is a mentor who will promote you and your interest within your organization. They should be someone who has your back, and who will tell the rest of the organization, including the senior management, how brilliant you are and how much you deserve recognition for your hard work. They should be recommending you for promotions. Start by building a relationship with your boss and other people in senior leadership positions. Pay close attention to these relationships and make sure you cultivate any relationship with anyone who believes in you and will publicly support you. These people are going to be your best advocates at work. 

Do you work in a male-dominated industry? What tips would you add?

mid-week round-up

Good morning my delightful friends! How are you today? We started watching Big Little Lies last night. What an all-star cast! The characters are super compelling but I’m not sure if I’m in love with the format just yet. I’m certainly hooked enough to keep watching though! Tomorrow we’re headed to the aquarium and I CAN’T WAIT! Hope you all have beautiful days, and here are a few things you may enjoy reading…

The politics of conspicuous displays of self-care.

50 things you need to eat in Miami before you die.

I NEED this In Omnia Paratus poster in my life!

The true story of the American work force as told by nine folks in the trenches.

How to become an adult. 
“Suddenly realize that you are now older than your parents when they got married, older than your parents when they had a kid, maybe older than your parents when they had you, even. Notice the ages come and go at which you had always told yourself you would have various little boxes checked, see them fading behind you like road signs, and feel a mix of disappointment and empowerment: “No, I am not the person I promised myself. Yes, I actually like this person better.”

French cartoonist Pénélope Bagieu has taken a unique opportunity to correct public misperceptions about the life of Mama Cass.

Related: Adding California Dreamin’: Cass Elliot Before The Mamas and The Papas by Pénélope Bagieu to my Amazon Wishlist.

Also Related: Five Great Graphic Novels!

To the women of America — A warning and a rallying cry from Poland.

Betsy DeVos and the history of homeschooling. 

Never been to Tokyo? Here’s a crib sheet of stuff that is useful for your first trip. #goals

The baby in the plastic bag. #longform

A call to travel abroad…in your own country.
“I was a foreign correspondent for many years, work that involves the shedding of assumptions and absorption in place. To see what’s over here, you have to let go of what’s over there. Scott County, for coastal metropolitan Americans, is a foreign land. In a fissured nation, there are fewer and fewer moments of genuine encounter between rival tribes, each confined in its ideological canyon. So what could bring the country together, usher Brooklyn closer to Scottsburg?”

Working while female. 

P.S. A few Finding Delight posts you may have missed — Carol Rossetti’s Colorful Illustrations of Female Empowerment and Winter Wardrobe Pieces.