Tag Archives: graphic novels

mid-week round-up

Good morning my delightful friends! How are you today? We started watching Big Little Lies last night. What an all-star cast! The characters are super compelling but I’m not sure if I’m in love with the format just yet. I’m certainly hooked enough to keep watching though! Tomorrow we’re headed to the aquarium and I CAN’T WAIT! Hope you all have beautiful days, and here are a few things you may enjoy reading…

The politics of conspicuous displays of self-care.

50 things you need to eat in Miami before you die.

I NEED this In Omnia Paratus poster in my life!

The true story of the American work force as told by nine folks in the trenches.

How to become an adult. 
“Suddenly realize that you are now older than your parents when they got married, older than your parents when they had a kid, maybe older than your parents when they had you, even. Notice the ages come and go at which you had always told yourself you would have various little boxes checked, see them fading behind you like road signs, and feel a mix of disappointment and empowerment: “No, I am not the person I promised myself. Yes, I actually like this person better.”

French cartoonist Pénélope Bagieu has taken a unique opportunity to correct public misperceptions about the life of Mama Cass.

Related: Adding California Dreamin’: Cass Elliot Before The Mamas and The Papas by Pénélope Bagieu to my Amazon Wishlist.

Also Related: Five Great Graphic Novels!

To the women of America — A warning and a rallying cry from Poland.

Betsy DeVos and the history of homeschooling. 

Never been to Tokyo? Here’s a crib sheet of stuff that is useful for your first trip. #goals

The baby in the plastic bag. #longform

A call to travel abroad…in your own country.
“I was a foreign correspondent for many years, work that involves the shedding of assumptions and absorption in place. To see what’s over here, you have to let go of what’s over there. Scott County, for coastal metropolitan Americans, is a foreign land. In a fissured nation, there are fewer and fewer moments of genuine encounter between rival tribes, each confined in its ideological canyon. So what could bring the country together, usher Brooklyn closer to Scottsburg?”

Working while female. 

P.S. A few Finding Delight posts you may have missed — Carol Rossetti’s Colorful Illustrations of Female Empowerment and Winter Wardrobe Pieces.

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Five Great Graphic Novels!

five-great

Are you a fan of graphic novels? They are my very favorite when it comes to one-sitting reads! I love how much the illustrations add to the overall story and you can really hear the characters speaking their conversation-bubble-dialogue.

Here are 5 of my favorites…

embroideriesEmbroideries by Marjane Satrapi

From the author of “Persepolis” comes this gloriously entertaining and enlightening look into the sex lives of Iranian women. Embroideries gathers together Marjane’s tough–talking grandmother, stoic mother, glamorous and eccentric aunt and their friends and neighbors for an afternoon of tea drinking and talking. 

The experiences of the women Satrapi brings to the table will seem equal parts relatable and foreign. Their stories of love and sex range from macabre and heart-breaking too irreverent and funny.

 

dotter-of-her-fathers-eyesDotter of her Father’s Eyes by Mary and Bryan Talbot

Part personal history, part biography, Dotter of Her Father’s Eyes contrasts two coming of age narratives: that of Lucia, the daughter of James Joyce, and that of author Mary Talbot, daughter of the eminent Joycean scholar James S. Atherton.

The dual narratives interact in compelling ways –Mary’s post WW II life in England juxtaposed with the Joyce family’s 1920s Paris avante guard experiences, and the complex family relationships that unfold in both.

 

cancer-vixen

Cancer Vixen by Marisa Acocella Marchetto

In vivid color and with a taboo-breaking sense of humor, Marchetto tells the story of her eleven-month, ultimately triumphant bout with breast cancer—from diagnosis to cure, and every challenging step in between.

Instead of writing another cancer memoir, Marchetto turned to cartooning. The result is an honest and engaging read, while the illustrations capture emotions in pitch-perfect form.

 

shortcomingsShortcomings by Adrian Tomine

Shortcomings is the story of Ben Tanaka, a Japanese American male in his late twenties, and his cross-country search for contentment (or at least the perfect girl). Along the way, Tomine tackles modern culture, sexual mores, and racial politics with brutal honesty and lacerating, irreverent humor, while deftly bringing to life a cast of painfully real antihero characters.

Tomine’s art is amazing, as is his deft portrayal of identity politics as his characters grapple with stereotypes and self-imposed expectations.

 

cant-we-talk-about-something-more-pleasantCan’t We Talk about Something More Pleasant? by Roz Chast

Roz Chast brings her signature wit to the topic of aging parents. Spanning the last several years of their lives and told through four-color cartoons, family photos, and documents. It’s a memoir as rife with laughs as it is with tears, both comfort and comic relief.

I picked this book up to flick through in a book store and then READ THE WHOLE THING RIGHT THERE. Do yourself a favor and check it out!

P.S. On my list for future reads: Pedro and Me, Flora & Ulysses, and This One Summer.