Tag Archives: writing

Hobbies to Try If You’re a Creative Soul

There is no denying that life is busy. And as we get older, the hobbies that we used to have can fall by the wayside. But isn’t it so wonderful when we can carve out a few hours here and there that can be used to explore hobbies and find fun creative outlets? 

Hobbies are therapeutic and great for happiness too. So here are a few creative hobbies that you can try. 

hobbies to try if you're a creative soul

Card Making

Handmade cards, with all their layers and personal touches, are really special. Using glue dots, you can build whole beautiful scenes. You can make a card whenever the mood takes you, or create a stash ready for Christmas or other significant events. If you really enjoy it, you might even be able to make a business out of it by selling your creations to friends for a few dollars or even setting up your own Etsy shop.

Writing

You might choose to start a blog, or you might just really want to keep a diary. Writing can be so therapeutic. You can write fiction and let your imagination run wild, or you might want to write about your daily life — talking about things you have enjoyed, what makes you happy, things you are grateful for and so much more. 

Calligraphy

There are tons of books out there centered around teaching yourself hand lettering. Not only does calligraphy look beautiful, but it is a skill that can grow over time. If you aren’t sold on the idea, you should take a look at some hand lettering videos. If you have decided to keep a journal, then you can use this skill to embellish it. Grab a pack of watercolor pens and see what happens!

Photography

Everyone has their own unique point of view. When you get to let loose with a camera, you might be surprised what you come up with. And it isn’t just DSLR. You can experiment with film, plates, instant and more. Picking up camera magazines will give you hints and tips about how to improve your style. You can work with the style that suits you best — some people love portraits, others black and white landscape. The joy of photography is being able to tell a story through images. There are many free courses online that can help you get to grips with some of the finer points of using your DLSR manually. But the main thing is to have fun. 

Soap

Soap making is a lovely and practical hobby. You can choose different scents and textures, and use molds too. There are so many tutorials on how to create natural soaps – which is excellent if you have sensitive skin or have family members who do. They make a great gift and can be infused with a lot of skin-loving ingredients. 

Baking

Baking for fun is fantastic. Not everyone can bake with ease, for some, it takes a lot of time to find out what they enjoy making. But if you enjoy eating scones and fresh bread, then learning to make it brings a new element of joy. Another bonus to learning to bake is having the smell of fresh bread wafting around your home. It is so cozy, and once you master a basic loaf, you can move on to more exciting bakes. 

Knitting

This is a real skill. Many people have tried and given up, but with a little persistence, you can knit tiny booties or scarves. You don’t need too much more than a set of knitting needles and some yarn to get started. If you’ve never knitted before, you are going to want to either pick up a knitting magazine with some basic patterns in or find some free online courses. Just think, by the time winter comes around, you will be able to gift everyone with something cozy and warm. 

Cross-stitch

You can buy mini kits that have everything in it. Or if you want to create something without a guide, you can pick up some cloth, cotton thread and get started. You can affix these to cards, or frame them and put them up as art. Because of the slow, repetitive motions, it is very therapeutic. 

Coloring

If you want to color in a Peppa Pig coloring book, then go for it, but if you want something more adult, check out this swear word coloring book (LOL) or coloring books featuring really intricate patterns. Coloring is something that millions of people are now including in their mindfulness and self-care routines. If you are a perfectionist, then you are going to take even longer – which is ideal if you want to while away the hours indulging in your hobbies. 

Quilting

Using clothing that you no longer wear, kids clothing that is too small, or even quilting squares, you can create a quilt for your bed, or give it as a gift when you are done. There is some mental work involved when you are piecing it together or deciding on what you want it to look like once it is done. There is something quite lovely about giving people a handmade quilt as the winter rolls around. 

Floral Crowns

Making floral crowns aren’t as tricky as they might look. You can buy plain headbands and hot-glue flowers all over it, or you might choose to use fake flowers with thin wires and twist them around to create a full crown. Have a chat with the local florist and see if you can collect flower heads that have fallen off and won’t be sold. You can offer to pay, but you might end up with a few bags at a time. 

 Letting your mind unwind and your hands work for a few hours a week is a great way to lower stress levels and have time for yourself. What do you think? Which one is your creative soul itching to try?!

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List 6: Favorite Words

A new series in which I share lists which I hope will help you to get to know me better. Why? Because I started this blog what feels like forever ago and there’s bound to be some new faces peering in once and awhile! So these posts are kinda like an introduction (or a reintroduction for those who’ve been with me since the jump!). A nice to meet ya, so glad you stopped by, now STAY AWHILE! Why lists? Because I love making ’em! (+ it’s the summer and I can give myself some grace when it comes to not posting overly-elaborate blog posts.)

dictionary favorite words

My favorite words are…

pompadour //
because it’s just so silly sounding

facetious //
because humor in serious situations is the story of my life

unequivocally //
because it sounds so much like what it means

resist //
because of this poem

y’all //
because second-person plural (and Kentucky)

crevasse //
because KREV-iss is crevice and kruh-VOSS is crevasse

disparate //
because why say different when you can say disparate

atoll //
because they’re a gosh darn natural wonder…see also: lagoon

summit //
because my inner voice is often a sherpa telling me to keep my eye on the prize

vanquish //
because it sounds so old-timey, dramatic, and REGAL

fierce //
because obvious reasons

wherewithal //
because it is extra

& any adverbs that end in -ly like certainly, knowingly, definitely, happily, and frequently // because I over-use them (but I’m trying to learn not to)

Tell me a few of your favorite words in the comments below! xoxo

[And in case you’re curious…

LIST 1
LIST 2 
LIST 3
LIST 4
LIST 5]

On Writing: A First Attempt at Self-Reflection.

typewriter

As you may have noticed, Finding delight. and writing in general have taken a bit of a backseat for me these last few weeks. Long work days, with long play days (I’m trying to enjoy Summer to it’s fullest while it lasts : ) interspersed as well, fill up my calendar to bursting. I figured this step away would be a great time to reflect on my writing. I strive to continue to grow and remain, as ever, a life-long learner. Here is a current assessment of my writing–

I’ve always felt an intense need to know the stories of others. Perhaps due to some innate, busybody quality so deeply ingrained in my curious person I seek them out without a moment’s hesitation. Or maybe, and this is certainly the more forgiving explanation I tend to hope is true, it is within these narratives I collect that my own story gains meaning. Yet peering down a dark, forgotten alleyway in someone else’s story in search of clues to create your own is troubling.  I once saw a newspaper cartoon sum up the marketability of our stories rather aptly. Two bookshelves were shown in the memoir section of a bookstore–one labeled “People with lives way better than mine,” the other “People with lives way worse than mine.” As a reader, these subsections are comforting. Escapism and reassurance. Self-help and self-congratulation. But as a writer, I end up wondering; how can I tell my own life without touting my privilege or weighing the tragedy I’ve encountered against others’? Will anyone peer around a corner in my life and, startled, run right into themselves?

As I’m seeking to incorporate my own story into my writing much more than ever before, not always as the subject of- but at least the framework for-, I find this familiarity with the stories of others to be both a strength and a weakness. I know how to tease emotion to the front of the page. I have an understanding of what readers find compelling. I am honest. But I worry about relatability. I worry about form and length. And most detrimental, I still believe I can make the words and thoughts of another more beautiful than I can make my own. The reader is my best friend and my greatest enemy. I concern myself with people’s perceptions and approval before the first word hits the page. I’m not going to bullshit and say I would write for no one, that is a lie. I want everything I write to be read. I write FOR readers. In the end, I believe this audience awareness is an asset.

All of this being said, there is no particular aspect of my writing which keeps me awake at night. Yes, I could stand a refresher course in grammar–specifically commas, my writing teacher brother so sweetly pointed out. (I can’t help that I love them.) I have a penchant for writing as if my words will be spoken not read. Sometimes my style is anything but succinct. But I’m not losing sleep over any of these assessments. I know they can be rectified with practice and patience. What keeps me awake at night are my ideas and brainstorms. I lie in bed going over all the directions a topic could go, the sentences that could snap, the sources I could pull from. Even the perfect wording to an email comes to me as I settle in and keeps me restless in the dark for hours. For far too long these thoughts were overwhelming and resulted in little more than daydreams and conversation fodder. But more and more, I am learning to just wake up and write.

In the coming weeks I shall explore what this assessment means for me as a blogger and will attempt to work towards regaining some consistency with my posts. I am working with a Writer’s Group for accountability purposes (which is super nerd-alert exciting for me) and camaraderie. My current goal for the next week is not just to WRITE but to work towards a more organized process. Any writers out there? What are your favorite organizational tips? I’d love to try my hand at some of your ideas or discuss them with my new writer’s crew. : )