Tag Archives: art history

mid-week round-up

It is finally (officially) Fall! YAY!!! What are you up to this week? Yesterday I worked from the library on FIU’s campus and Chet treated me to lunch at the University’s faculty club. There was legit a piano player and gold rimmed tea cups with saucers. Not too shabby for a Tuesday afternoon. Hope you have a great rest of your week, and here are some links I’ve found interesting lately…

Ask a mortician explains the frozen bodies of Mt. Everest and Titanic’s dead.

Related: On the rooftop of the world.

NPR names Lost Bayou Rambler’s Kalenda a song they love.

Photos from a battered Puerto Rico.

Elaine Welteroth, editor-in-chief of Teen Vogue, has reinvented the magazine.

Mark Zuckerberg’s American Tour.

37 unique scare movies every horror fan must see.

These would be perfect to have on hand this Fall to sweeten a cup of tea and soothe a sore throat.

Related: Hot Toddy Recipe

In 13 states, parents can force teen moms to give birth without an epidural.

How do families around the world spend their vacation?
(All of these vacays look really nice but the photos from the water park in China give me so much anxiety. TOO. MANY. PEOPLE!)

100 lunch ideas when you’re not sure what the heck to pack for work.

How cute is this pillow?

A secret history of the pissing figure in art.

P.S. A few Finding Delight posts you may have missed — An Afternoon of Art – Frost Art Museum and Must-Haves For Sleeping in the Heat.

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mid-week round-up

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Hello again! It seems folks all over the country have been experiencing a cold snap these last few days so I hope you’re managing to stay warm and toasty. The lows in Miami were in the 50’s and it was amusing to watch the locals break out their parkas and beanies. That’s practically an arctic blast down here! In other news, Chet and I are headed to St. Pete tomorrow. I’m super stoked to see my sister, play a little shuffleboard, and enjoy the gulf-side of the state for a few days. Have you ever been to St. Petersburg, FL? Any recommendations? I’ll post what we’re up to over on my Instagram. Hope you have a great rest of your week, and here are a few links for you to peruse…

The tech inside this 19th century conveyance isn’t stuck in the 19th century.

This and a set of stencils seems like a fun recipe for a whole host of DIYs.

Making Oprah: The inside story of a TV revolution.

How adorable would it be to scatter these around a wedding reception venue?

Why is this painting so captivating?

I’m obsessed with Alessandra Olanow’s illustrations.

Meryl Streep’s Golden Globes speech.

How we found (and lost) the dream of Personal Rapid Transit.

A genius way to give back.

A Harvard linguist reveals the most misused words in English.

Make college football great again by making it more like high-school debate.

There are as many names for french toast as ways to cook it.

P.S. A few Finding Delight posts you might enjoy — My Three Favorite Make-Ahead Breakfast Recipes and The Big Business of College Sports.

Corita Kent: In the Beginning was the Word

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While my mom was in town last week, we stopped by The Frost Art Museum at FIU. One exhibit up for display was the work of Corita Kent. She was an iconic pop artist, prolific activist for peace, and, at one time, a nun. Her pieces were so inspiring and I’d love to plaster them all over my walls. I thought her life story and work was fascinating, and wanted to share a little bit with you guys…

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Her Background: Born Frances Elizabeth Kent in Fort Dodge, Iowa in 1918, Kent joined the Roman Catholic order of Sisters of the Immaculate Heart of Mary in Los Angeles in 1936. She took the name Sister Mary Corita. After receiving an education in art and art history, she became an teacher and later the chair of the art department at Immaculate Heart College which housed the likes of Alfred Hitchcock and Charles & Ray Eames. Her own art was almost exclusively serigraphy, developing innovative methods of screen printing. Over the course of her career she created hundreds of designs, for posters, murals, book covers, and even a U.S. Postal Service stamp. Her art, with a strong focus on messages of peace and love, gained popularity during the 60s and 70s. While her politics, geared toward activism and a strong opposition to war, led her to split from her Catholic order around that same time.

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Her Art: Corita Kent most often used popular culture as material for her art. Her screen prints would incorporate imagery from well-known products and brands alongside texts of a spiritual or peace-promoting leaning. In this way, she created a juxtaposition between acknowledged “art” and imagery most associated with American consumerism, art encountered in everyday life. She placed the ordinary with the holy, the picture on the front of the cereal box with the words of scholars and saints. As Harvey Cox, a theologian and friend of Kent’s, remarked, “Like a priest, a shaman, a magician, she could pass her hands over the commonest of the everyday, the superficial, the oh-so-ordinary, and make it a vehicle of the luminous, the only, and the hope filled.”

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Her Teaching: Whether the faith infused in Kent’s work is holy or human is irrelevant, because her body of work ultimately highlights the inherent fusion of both. As such, in her teaching, Corita Kent focused less on showing her students how to paint and draw and screenprint, and more on helping them see the world anew. She taught her classes to gain new perspectives with the help of a 35 mm slide mount that students could look through to frame compositions and images. She encouraged students to seek out revolution in their everyday. If you’re interested in experiencing Kent’s teachings firsthand, her book is linked below, and is chock-full of unique assignments for fostering creativity.

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Read More: 

Someday is Now: The Art of Corita Kent

Corita Kent: An overshadowed pop art icon

Learning by Heart: Teachings to Free the Creative Spirit by Corita Kent and Jan Steward

mid-week round-up

mwru street scene

What are you up to this week? Yesterday we went to the pool (again!) and had it all to ourselves. And last night we watched So You Think You Can Dance. Have y’all been watching this season? I LOVE Gaby and Jaja! Chet is going to ask his students today for hole-in-the-wall Cuban restaurants so we can check one out this weekend. Can’t wait. Have a great week, loves! Here are a few links for you to peruse. Once you’ve clicked ’em all you’ll be THAT much closer to the weekend! Enjoy…

Don’t buy cheap pork. Two words: manure lagoons.

Atlanta teacher asks, “What teachers’ lounge?”

Nutritional factors may be a piece of someone’s mental health picture.

Beautiful tribute to Nora Ephron.

The poverty line was set under the assumption that every household would have a houseWIFE.

Could a painting have killed Caravaggio (and other famous artists)?

College housing isn’t always as plush as the brochures would have you believe.

Sad to have left Lexington before Broomwagon opened. Check them out if you’re in the area!

Former N’Sync singer to One Direction: “Everything is about to be terrible.”

“One day moooore!” sing the teachers of West Des Moines.

Egg freezing is being touted as a reliable way for career-oriented women to delay motherhood. But is it? 

From the streets of Baltimore to the syllabus at University of Maryland Law School.

P.S. In case you missed it, here are 7 colorful accents to turn any room from white to bright!

Woman in Gold.

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Have you seen the new movie Woman in Gold? I saw it recently and was quite impressed! The title of the movie references a painting by Gustav Klimt, Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer I, which I saw in-person when I lived in Vienna as a child. Much of the movie is set in Vienna so, while it struck quite a nostalgic chord for me, the plot was still wildly compelling

Starring Helen Mirren and Ryan Reynolds, the movie is based on the real life of Maria Altmann, an aging escapee of the Holocaust, who enlists the help of a young lawyer to take the Austrian government to court in order to reclaim Klimt’s portrait of her beloved Aunt. The painting, along with other valuables, had been taken from her Jewish family’s home by Nazis just before WWII. Looking back, it’s harrowing to think of the potential pillaging which proceeded the path many works of art took to reach my view when I was standing awe-struck in museums across Europe in 1995. The art restitution movement only really began to reach fever pitch, certainly in Austria at least, in 1998. How much of my young cultural exposure was a result of Nazism? But this sort of reflection, uncomfortable as it may be, is perhaps why this story is so powerful.

From USA Today:

Mirren said she felt the weight of keeping history alive in conveying Altmann’s tale — particularly for younger generations.

“There’s the line I added to the script: ‘Because people forget, you know. Especially the young.’ And it’s true,” she says. “We are losing the generation of people who had firsthand experience of (the Holocaust). I think the pain and the trauma of it was so profound they couldn’t speak about it for a long time and it’s only toward the end of their life they began to articulate what had happened to them, to remember it and live it again.”

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Even the trailer, above, gets me a little choked up. Have you seen it? Will you? Want to hear more about my super 90’s childhood in Austria? Leave it in the comments below…