Tag Archives: art

mid-week round-up

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Happy Wednesday! I can’t believe it is already March. Did the month come in like a lion where you’re at? I hope you have a great day, whatever you’re up to, and here are a few links to explore (or bookmark for later)…

Rachel Dolezal was exposed as a white woman who had deceived almost everyone she knew. Why did she do it?

15 beautiful illustrations perfectly capture how it feels to be in love.

As automation reduces the need for human labor, some Silicon Valley executives think
a universal income will be the answer — and the beta test is happening in Kenya.

Tucking this podcast away for a rainy day.

A go-to meal for any time of day — but especially yummy at breakfast.

Everyday carry with the Tom Bihn Side Effect. (I totally want one now!)

Related: 3 Ways to Pack Your Tom Bihn Synapse 19

A shirt for those who dream big and hustle hard.

Related: Don’t Hide Your Hustle: Katie KelseyLatasha

10 days along the border.

I’m considering starting a Whole 30 this month and this cookbook came highly recommended.

The enduring portrait of Myspace Tom, the Mona Lisa of profile pictures.

When a woman deletes a man’s comments online.
“It is no surprise to me that online debate has become the international sport of cis white men. Those who are least likely to be negatively impacted by the outcomes of discussions regarding the rights of marginalized people, who are driven by little more than ego and the risk of slight discomfort if society is made more equal, can gleefully jump from post to post, forum to forum, challenging the heartfelt pleas of those most at risk. “Well actuallys” are flung at those working for justice and equality like drive-bys of apathy. And those who are fighting for their lives are then forced to battle each challenger bearing advanced degrees in Google and entitlement in order to prevent the outright dismissal of their lived experience.”

Long-distance Uber & Lyft drivers’ crazy commutes, marathon days, and big paychecks.

P.S. A few Finding Delight posts you may have missed — 10 Ways to Take a Time Out and Practice Self Care and I Stopped Paying Women Compliments On Their Appearance and Here’s What Happened.

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mid-week round-up

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Hello again! It seems folks all over the country have been experiencing a cold snap these last few days so I hope you’re managing to stay warm and toasty. The lows in Miami were in the 50’s and it was amusing to watch the locals break out their parkas and beanies. That’s practically an arctic blast down here! In other news, Chet and I are headed to St. Pete tomorrow. I’m super stoked to see my sister, play a little shuffleboard, and enjoy the gulf-side of the state for a few days. Have you ever been to St. Petersburg, FL? Any recommendations? I’ll post what we’re up to over on my Instagram. Hope you have a great rest of your week, and here are a few links for you to peruse…

The tech inside this 19th century conveyance isn’t stuck in the 19th century.

This and a set of stencils seems like a fun recipe for a whole host of DIYs.

Making Oprah: The inside story of a TV revolution.

How adorable would it be to scatter these around a wedding reception venue?

Why is this painting so captivating?

I’m obsessed with Alessandra Olanow’s illustrations.

Meryl Streep’s Golden Globes speech.

How we found (and lost) the dream of Personal Rapid Transit.

A genius way to give back.

A Harvard linguist reveals the most misused words in English.

Make college football great again by making it more like high-school debate.

There are as many names for french toast as ways to cook it.

P.S. A few Finding Delight posts you might enjoy — My Three Favorite Make-Ahead Breakfast Recipes and The Big Business of College Sports.

mid-week round-up

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Back from Louisiana and back for another mid-week round-up. What has everyone been up to? While our trip to Lafayette was book-ended with sadness (we found out Chet’s grandfather passed away while we were en route and attended his funeral on Monday); visiting with family, eating amazing Cajun food, and sitting in the sun for a couple afternoons at a music festival were just what we needed. Now we’re strapping in for a quick week with plenty to do. But before productivity takes over, here are a dozen links to enjoy…

Add this Apple Cider Sangria to your autumnal drink rotation.

A DIY centerpiece for maximum Halloween ambiance.

The racist and sexist history of keeping birth control side effects secret.

Breaking down an effective Sunday meal prep.

A fast-food journey from Hamburger University to celebrity-filled Hollywood parties.

Remembering when Melrose Place became a conceptual art project.

This book looks fascinating.

Arguing is easy; persuasion is hard.

How to walk around the world without leaving New York.

Actually, many inner cities are doing great.

A fascinating experiment in gender mainstreaming.

The opposite of a muse.

mid-week round-up

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How’s everyone doing today? We spent the weekend and last couple days without internet but I’m happy to report that it has made a triumphant return. We joked that we were living in prairie times. Luckily we had DVD’s for entertainment and a library to schlep to in order to get some work done. It’s funny how reliant we become on this one little thing. I felt like a whiny child who got a toy taken away! Something to think about. I’ve always harbored a slight desire to institute a technology-free weekend once a month. Now I feel it’s a must! Could I even do it? Could you? Anywho, since we aren’t there yet, enjoy these links brought to you by TECHNOLOGY…

“I’m pro-life. And I’m voting for Hillary.

Great adult coloring books to take on-the-go!

I would love to hang this print in my living room.

Competition between women doesn’t need to have an agenda.

A protein-packed breakfast muffin recipe.

Why the Clinton America sees isn’t the Clinton colleagues know.

Twinning.

A menstruation investigation about bleeding on the job.

The case for more female cops.

The year I went off birth control, I had great sex, cried a lot, got angry, and split up with two different guys. Coincidence?

Who knew I would want this tectonic plates necklace so badly?!

Grape, feta and bacon salad with creamy dijon dressing. #yum

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Corita Kent: In the Beginning was the Word

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While my mom was in town last week, we stopped by The Frost Art Museum at FIU. One exhibit up for display was the work of Corita Kent. She was an iconic pop artist, prolific activist for peace, and, at one time, a nun. Her pieces were so inspiring and I’d love to plaster them all over my walls. I thought her life story and work was fascinating, and wanted to share a little bit with you guys…

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Her Background: Born Frances Elizabeth Kent in Fort Dodge, Iowa in 1918, Kent joined the Roman Catholic order of Sisters of the Immaculate Heart of Mary in Los Angeles in 1936. She took the name Sister Mary Corita. After receiving an education in art and art history, she became an teacher and later the chair of the art department at Immaculate Heart College which housed the likes of Alfred Hitchcock and Charles & Ray Eames. Her own art was almost exclusively serigraphy, developing innovative methods of screen printing. Over the course of her career she created hundreds of designs, for posters, murals, book covers, and even a U.S. Postal Service stamp. Her art, with a strong focus on messages of peace and love, gained popularity during the 60s and 70s. While her politics, geared toward activism and a strong opposition to war, led her to split from her Catholic order around that same time.

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Her Art: Corita Kent most often used popular culture as material for her art. Her screen prints would incorporate imagery from well-known products and brands alongside texts of a spiritual or peace-promoting leaning. In this way, she created a juxtaposition between acknowledged “art” and imagery most associated with American consumerism, art encountered in everyday life. She placed the ordinary with the holy, the picture on the front of the cereal box with the words of scholars and saints. As Harvey Cox, a theologian and friend of Kent’s, remarked, “Like a priest, a shaman, a magician, she could pass her hands over the commonest of the everyday, the superficial, the oh-so-ordinary, and make it a vehicle of the luminous, the only, and the hope filled.”

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Her Teaching: Whether the faith infused in Kent’s work is holy or human is irrelevant, because her body of work ultimately highlights the inherent fusion of both. As such, in her teaching, Corita Kent focused less on showing her students how to paint and draw and screenprint, and more on helping them see the world anew. She taught her classes to gain new perspectives with the help of a 35 mm slide mount that students could look through to frame compositions and images. She encouraged students to seek out revolution in their everyday. If you’re interested in experiencing Kent’s teachings firsthand, her book is linked below, and is chock-full of unique assignments for fostering creativity.

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Read More: 

Someday is Now: The Art of Corita Kent

Corita Kent: An overshadowed pop art icon

Learning by Heart: Teachings to Free the Creative Spirit by Corita Kent and Jan Steward

mid-week round-up

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Welcome to another edition of the mid-week round-up! I hope everyone is faring well on this lovely Wednesday. Today, I’d like to extend a huge congratulations to the Western Kentucky University Forensics Team for their win at the National Forensics Association national tournament in both Lincoln-Douglas debate AND individual events. So proud to be a Hilltopper! #4’s up! STNJ! Now, onto the links…

Mexican Quinoa Salad looks like a really yummy, weeknight dinner.

Mary Kay’s empowering pyramid scheme.

Monica Lewinsky and the politics of heterosexuality in the 1990’s.

College dorms of yesteryear.

SUPER cute pregnancy announcement by Irish vloggers the Saccone-Joly’s.

10 printable Mother’s Day cards.

Attn: Lexington Catholic High School educators: Books for white teachers.

Just another reason I need a yard.

The wondrous survival of a 72-year-old woman lost for 9 days in the wilderness.

What women do when no one’s watching.

How soon until we photograph everything and look at nothing?

33 DIY projects in case you feel like makin’ and craftin’ this week.

mid-week round-up

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What’s everyone up to this week? My sister and her friend came for a visit over the weekend, and we had a great time exploring the huge park in my neighborhood and eating the yummiest Cuban food. On Sunday we went to The Deering Estate where Katie participated in a table reading of a brand new script written by an up and coming playwright. It was so good! Wishing you all a beautiful spring day, and now on to the links…

Top chef turned cafeteria lady.

Never underestimate the power of a woman — or 100.

Real female actors reading real casting calls.

Picasso’s multi-billion dollar empire.

What happens when you dress like Lorelai Gilmore for a week?

A St. Patrick’s Day feast you can fix up in a single skillet.

How Braille won the war of the dots.

Mail used to come with a side of MEOW.

Was Chipotle the victim of corporate sabotage? (Someone should make a documentary!)

Speaking of cool posters, you can now download 2,000 turn-of-the-century posters courtesy of the New York Public Library!

To men I love, about men who scare me.

I’m feeling a pair of these for spring! What do you think?

P.S. ICYMI – Thoughts on tackling unfinished projects and a Cincinnati chili recipe!

mid-week round-up

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According to several news sources, winter has arrived in South Florida! While that translates to temperatures in the 60’s, and high 60’s at that, I’ll take it! Keeping our giant sliding doors open during the day for a cool breeze to blow through the apartment is amazing. How’s your winter faring? However it’s going, I hope you enjoy these links…

Keep your chopping board from sliding around.

Have you watched Making a Murderer yet? So gripping!

Many people thrive in the aftermath of adversity.

A Ragdoll’s favorite things.

How gorgeous is this nail color?

It seems these days that every major global event attracts a corresponding counter-narrative.

A beautiful (and free!) way to stay organized in 2016.

A bunch of drunks and a few cops achieve art’s “golden ratio.”

Taking the home office to a whole new level.

Challenge yourself in 2016 with #BustleReads.

A great long-form read, if you’ve got the time.

Bad Yogis. 

An Afternoon of Art – Frost Art Museum

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Just because Chet works at Florida International University doesn’t mean we can’t play there too! Universities and colleges are a great resource for finding fun (and usually affordable) experiences and activities. On a recent rainy afternoon we headed to campus to check out the Frost Art Museum. There was no entrance fee and the staff at the desk explained what exhibits were up and where they were located within the museum. We set off down the hallway and were greeted by this installation by Pawel Nowak featuring Polish passport photos.

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Upstairs were the main exhibits. The rooms were gorgeously kept, with shiny wooden floors and the occasional skylight letting in peaks of natural light, and the art expertly displayed. Here’s what we saw —

Cartographies of Water by Rufina Santana

Santana’s art was deeply inspired by her homeland–The Canary Islands. The rugged volcanic rock shaping the islands, the exotic plant life, and of course the ocean are all expertly depicted in her work. It’s the endlessness of the sea, she says, which captivates her imagination. Just like a wide stretch of dark ocean waters, the paintings felt bold and expansive while also fearless.

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There Are No Other Everglades in the World by Jim Couper

Couper’s paintings highlight the characteristics unique to the Everglades, a distinct and fragile environment located no where else in the world. He utilizes a bright palette of colors to play with the various ways the sub-tropical light changes and transforms the magnificent waters. His brushstrokes reminded me of an Impressionist painter’s, like Claude Monet. I found myself wanting to jump into the canvas and live in one of these serene waterscapes.

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Green Machine by Carlos Luna

Luna is one of the foremost contemporary Cuban artists. He represents a generation of Cubans who embrace their heritage but also reinvent and adapt themselves to new trends and techniques. The exhibit featured a multitude of artistic media styles, including; painted canvas, mixed media work on paper, ceramics, and fine art tapestries. Luna is clearly a multi-talented artist. Working in Puebla, Mexico for 13 years after leaving Cuba, Luna now resides in Miami, and it was interesting to see the strong influences of those three places coalescing in his various pieces.

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Behind the museum is a lovely little lake watched over by this guy. Oh, Florida!

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We topped off our afternoon with iced coffees and a stroll through campus. The student union was buzzing with weekend activity. The space between buildings is full of great outdoor seating, including some contraptions which I feel are called gondolas but I really have no idea if they have a name. They’re essentially a picnic table…with a canopy for shade…and the whole thing swings back and forth. I. Want. One. Anywho, I can’t wait to go back to the museum as the exhibits change over the coming months! And I’m excited to discover what else FIU has to offer us. Perhaps a dance performance or a concert!?

Do you scope out activities at your local college campus? Would you? Do you have a favorite art museum? Let me know in the comments below! 

mid-week round-up

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What are you up to this week? This past weekend was in the 70’s and sunny, so I had a lovely time zipping around the city and even took in an outdoor percussion concert. Can’t wait for summer adventures to begin! Have a great Wednesday, and here’s a little link love from me to you…

I wonder why people keep mentioning this story to me? #lastnameproblems

Doodle blog.

Lawmakers would have us believe that being poor is awesome.

In case you’re apartment hunting.

Grow your food! (More garden porn.)

These jokes take me back to 2002 in a BIG way.

A sweet grocery list template.

Looking at the first and final frames of great films.

Food secrets for a long life.

Marketing bifurcation is generally bullshit.

Relatable.

As a former forensics educator, this piece hit my heart. #LetMatthewTeach