Tag Archives: journalism

mid-week round-up

Happy Wednesday, folks!! What are you up to this week? I’ve been pretty busy the last few weeks. The type of busy where I’m relishing in that productive, crossing stuff off my To-Do list feeling and not the type where I’m feeling overwhelmed. Which is nice. Fingers crossed I keep it up! In the midst of it all, the (slightly) cooler temperatures have given me a touch of a sore throat (bleck!). But that’s all the more reason to live my best Hygge life and drink a ton of hot tea!! I’m sure I’ll be on the up and up in no time. Hope everyone is killin’ it on this mid-week day, and that you have a few moments to enjoy some links…

The things I shrugged off then horrify me now.

Lego’s “Women of Nasa” sale lifts off, lands as best-selling toy.

Climate gentrification in Miami.

A fast-food journey from Hamburger University to celebrity-filled Hollywood parties.

How cute would these rustic bees be on a gallery wall?

The story of two black midwives in Southern California.

Pearson issues an apology for publishing racist theories about treating pain in their nursing textbook.

Will you read the Bush twins’ new book?

Welcome to the DPRK.

Fictional President held to higher standard than actual President.

Every year in New Orleans, a group assembles to celebrate Lee Harvey Oswald’s birthday.

Related: Me & Lee: How I Came to Know, Love and Lose Lee Harvey Oswald by Judith Vary Baker

Donald Trump reveres his father but almost never talks about his mother. Why not?

P.S. A couple Finding Delight posts you may have missed — Christmas Gifts for the Moms in Your Life and The 5-4-3-2-1 Packing Formula.

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mid-week round-up

Editor’s Note: Today, Finding Delight is thrilled to welcome Adam to our weekly round-up for the second time. (Here’s his first visit to the Mid-Week Round-Up.) I hope his post and links resonate as much with you as they did with me. 

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Over the weekend I was cyberbullied. It wasn’t the standard “you’re a liberal snowflake asshole” attack you might expect. It was more vicious this time and quickly escalated from some guy making veiled homophobic comments to likes and retweets of an emerging chorus of “queer” and “glory hole sucker” posts aimed directly at me. A couple of the attack tweeters lifted my profile picture and began using it in their posts. Clicking onto their profiles, I saw them having separate conversations about me, using my picture and saying things like I was a “disgusting queer” and “probably have AIDS.”

Full disclosure: I’ve written a few loud and arguably ignorant comments on some crazy-pants Facebook posts. I usually give social media attacks directed at me a pass, thinking “I, too, have posted things that 20 minutes later made me shameful.”

This time though, after resisting the desire to fight back and simply reporting them, I tried to go on with my day. But hours later, I had to keep checking on the tightness in my chest.

I wondered how women and female journalists continue to endure this on a daily basis. 

The attack made me think back to one of my 2017 New Year’s resolutions: Get off social media. Why didn’t I stick with it? Why am I even on here

Perhaps I’ve just accepted that virtual bullying comes with the territory? In truth, it’s easy for me to accept that reality; I’ve lived most my life knowing there’s a strong likelihood that a passing stranger will call me a fag

So many people face vicious onslaughts of degradation simply by being present in both virtual and real-world spaces. Social media and internet links, so often, seem to be a product used to push shame; an evolving technology dedicated to tearing people down in ways that transcend virtual space with real life implications.

But looking over stories about the Muslim travel ban protests at airports all over the country, I realized the reason I’m still here—present in the shit hole that is social media—because it’s the links… Our links to one another are important. 

It was the Instagram post from a friend that helped me stop feeling bad about the bullying I faced. The hate is not normal—and I do not have to tolerate it. 

Seeing this tweet of a nun jamming at the airport protest in San Francisco made me laugh. Hard. The link was important. The Stanger Things’ SAG award acceptance and Wynona Ryder’s face made me take in the fact that America is already great.

I am benefiting from the resistance and the “personalized act[s] of labor dedicated to communal protest,” which are so often being transmitted through links—nudging me to recognize that now is not the right time to leave social media

The link-driven resistance is not a bunch of “liberal lawyers,” as the New York Times might argue. It’s about sharing stories to bend the arch of justice toward a shared sense of ethical humanity.

I will continue to actively link with the resistance by writing personal op-eds and showing up at town halls.

I will continue finding Finding Delight’s Wednesday links post through social media. It’s important to be connected these days. 

So, for the sake of theme and the goal of promoting a shared sanity in these harsh times, here are some other, more specific hyperlinks that you might also find helpful:

Anyway, with that, I hope you “like” this Wednesday’s links post. And I hope you “like” other peoples’ links too—it’s critical for us to lift up and recognize individuals and institutions when they’re focused on promoting truth.

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Girl Crush: Sarah Koenig

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I’ve been a long-time lover of This American Life but recently my girl crush on staff producer Sarah Koenig has been through the roof! A few weeks ago, TAL aired an episode that also served as the first episode for a spin-off podcast called Serial. I was immediately hooked. Sarah’s poignant journalism and writing is unparalleled. Over the course of the season, Serial is unfolding just one non-fiction story–in this case, a story about a murder and high school sweethearts and a man’s claimed innocence. Basically, a tale you want to tune in for.  And they promise to keep telling the story until they “get to the bottom of it”.

This is all to say, I’m completely obsessed with Sarah Koenig. I want to be her. If you haven’t checked out Serial yet you totally should. No one could tell this story like her.

P.S. Here are some of Ms. Koenig’s best-loved This American Life episodes and one of my favorite episodes that I still talk about all the time.

 

(Photo by Meredith Heuer.)

 

Strawberry Walks into Bar.

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I just finished this book, girl walks into a bar. by Strawberry Saroyan, that I scored last year at the Friends of the Library book sale for a buck. While at times the memoir feels a bit banal, it does paint a clear picture of life in the magazine (and pseudo-famous) world of the angst-riddled 90’s. The memoir is split into chapters which read more like individual essays as opposed to supporting an over-arching story, yet thematically they all work in the context of the title–Saroyan seems to have “come of age” so to speak in the various bars she frequented.

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Here she discusses her ritual of going to bars every Thursday night with a group of friends she made after moving cross country in her mid-20’s:

We weren’t just people who hung out at a bar one evening a week together, trying to valet our screwed-up cars as discreetly as possible before dashing in in our fancy duds. We were friends. For even though they’d all seemed so glittering to me, the truth was we were all, to varying degrees, alone: Rich or poor, ascending or not, we were almost all professionally freelance, and personally single.

We were all edging toward thirty, too, without the family and kids that some of us had been taught to expect by this time, but even more than that, without the sense of being adults that had been implicitly promised us. None of us felt like adults. And it’s something that I’ve still rarely heard acknowledged, but that I find to be almost frighteningly true: No one ever tells you that you’re never going to feel grown-up.

Proto Lena Dunham Lena Dunham-y, amirite? Basically, if you find hipster-y lifestyle blogs and Girls entertaining and painfully relatable I think you’ll dig this book. (And the last essay reads a bit like Frances Ha.) Just don’t go into it expecting a narrative because all you’re gonna get are some general quarter-life crises musings.

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I enjoyed this book best while munching on self-made trail mix and drinking a berry smoothie. My favorite of the essays was the bounty boys.

P.S. Check out this piece Strawberry wrote for The New York Times in 2004 after Gwyneth Paltrow named her daughter Apple. Those fruit-named gals have to stick together, I suppose.