Tag Archives: NPR

mid-week round-up

Hola! How’s everyone doing this week? We booked an Airbnb for our friends’ wedding next month. It’s in Savannah, GA and I’m getting increasingly excited about returning to that charming, southern city. Have you ever been? Any recommendations? Have a wonderful rest of your day, and enjoy a few links on me…

16 weird forgotten English words we should bring back.

Related: Are you a word nerd?

Amanda Knox shares what romance in prison actually looks like.
“Prison is an isolating place. You’re forcibly removed from your homes and support network. You’re deprived freedom of movement, of social interaction, and of time. You’re forced to submit to total surveillance and control by strangers, alongside strangers. But relationships help keep us sane, even if they’re forbidden or not ideal.”

5 tips for capturing magical everyday moments.

50 everyday acts of rebellion.

A book to help you kick the plastic habit.

Photographer Claude Cahun resisted the Nazis, escaped death, and created great art.

Martha Washington’s diamond ring. (It has a secret locket!)

To listen to NPR today — and really for most of its 47 years — is to listen to the voices of women.
“The centrality of women’s voices in establishing NPR’s distinctive sound serves as important context for thinking about the cultural and political significance of the network today. Given the unprecedented role that gender politics played in the last election, it might be worthwhile to reflect on the role of women’s voices in making public radio so threatened and, perhaps, threatening.”

How to bathe like an 18th-century queen.

Related: The 5 things that turned me into a shower lover.

Thank you (Yes you!) cards.

I planned my wedding in 5 days. You could, too.

A brief history of men getting credit for women’s accomplishments.

P.S. I’d like to start sharing a few links throughout the week, too. Follow Finding Delight on Facebook so you won’t miss out! 

Serial parodies.

sarahk

Did you guys listen to the ending of Serial? Chet and I played it on Thursday night (along with breakfast for dinner…get it? Serial…Cereal?) and then proceeded to read all things Serial related on the internet for the rest of the night. If you haven’t seen them yet, here are two HILARIOUS parodies of the show…

Spot on! Do you listen to any podcasts? I’d love recommendations! I’m a long-time listener of This American Life and I used to listen to The Story and Q with Jian Ghomeshi when I worked from home (although The Story isn’t producing shows anymore and Jian has his own issues to deal with now). Anywho, if you loved Serial be sure to tune in to Fresh Air tomorrow! Terry Gross will be interviewing Sarah Koenig and apparently it’s the definitive Serial interview. As with all things Sarah, I’m sure I’ll be on the edge of my seat through out. Yay podcasts!

(top photo of Sarah Koenig and Dana Chervis via here.)

 

mid-week round-up

cobblestones

I hope everyone had a relaxing holiday weekend! If you’re in a reading (and watching) mood during this short week, here are a few fun posts from around the web to help distract ya from the work you didn’t want to do anyways. Have a good one, darlings!

The greatest response to an accidental “Reply All.”

Great piece on Lexington, KY and gentrification.

This is bananas and a must watch for any John Munch fans.

My brother on why he became and remains a Barenaked Ladies fan. (We saw them in concert together way back in the day!)

Any Anglophiles out there?

Not many animated kids’ movies feature a named Mother who lives until the credits roll.

A catch-up with the Bad Yogi herself, Erin Motz.

Saeed Jones’ must-read on being an American male.

Well, this is relateable. (I accidentally on purpose started binge watching this on Hulu the other day.)

These certainly look like something that needs to GET IN MY BELLY.

A lovely, new-to-me fashion blog.

China questioning their national character.

And awesome news! You can now watch the complete series of “The Wire” on Amazon Prime Instant Video.

See you guys tomorrow! ❤

P.S. My shoe capsule and my latest book recommendation, in case you missed ’em.

An (UN)arranged marriage.

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA

A few weeks ago, I was struck by this interview on NPR’s Weekend Edition Sunday with Fraidy Reiss, a woman whose religion and culture dictated when and whom she should wed. At 19 and an abusive man who later, when Reiss was reaching out for help, elders in her community would defend as simply having “a little bit of a temper.”

After leaving her husband and the Ultra-Orthodox Jewish community, she founded a non-profit organization to help other women escape arranged marriages. Because guess what? Women being manipulated in the name of God, their heritage, family pride, or some twisted take on tradition happens in America way more often than we care to realize.

It is hard to determine just how many arranged marriages occur in the United States each year but what we do know is that most states lack the legislation to protect women when they go wrong.

Reiss was partnered with her husband by a professional matchmaker, a common occurrence in the Orthodox Jewish community. “It never occurred to me that I was doing anything other than what I had always dreamed of doing,” she says. But, merely one week into married existence, Reiss discovered that life with this stranger was not headed towards wedded bliss. After her family and multiple rabbis refused to assist the young bride, she looked else where…

From the accompanying NPR article:

After a particularly violent episode, Reiss says, she went to the police to get a temporary restraining order, a first for a woman in her community. That was a mistake, she says.

“I realized too late that one of the gravest sins in the Orthodox Jewish community is ratting out your fellow Jew to secular authorities,” she says. The rabbis sent an attorney from the community to Reiss’ house to drive with her to family court and tell the judge she wanted to drop the restraining order.

After getting a degree and a job, Reiss was finally able to take her 2 children and leave the marriage. She was promptly declared dead by the rest of her family and shunned.

However, Reiss would go on to found Unchained At Last, a non-profit organization which helps women like her escape forced or arranged marriages–offering free legal counsel, social services and a mentor program. For many of these women, this way of life is the only one they know and they have no one to help them. Conversely, Unchained At Last envisions a world where women are free to choose when, whom and whether they marry.

If you’d like to listen to the NPR interview with Fraidy Reiss CLICK HERE.

If you’d like to check out the fantastic organization, Unchained At Last CLICK HERE.

And if this story strikes you, as it did me, I strongly encourage you to make a donation HERE.