Tag Archives: history

mid-week round-up

Hola! How’s everyone doing this week? We booked an Airbnb for our friends’ wedding next month. It’s in Savannah, GA and I’m getting increasingly excited about returning to that charming, southern city. Have you ever been? Any recommendations? Have a wonderful rest of your day, and enjoy a few links on me…

16 weird forgotten English words we should bring back.

Related: Are you a word nerd?

Amanda Knox shares what romance in prison actually looks like.
“Prison is an isolating place. You’re forcibly removed from your homes and support network. You’re deprived freedom of movement, of social interaction, and of time. You’re forced to submit to total surveillance and control by strangers, alongside strangers. But relationships help keep us sane, even if they’re forbidden or not ideal.”

5 tips for capturing magical everyday moments.

50 everyday acts of rebellion.

A book to help you kick the plastic habit.

Photographer Claude Cahun resisted the Nazis, escaped death, and created great art.

Martha Washington’s diamond ring. (It has a secret locket!)

To listen to NPR today — and really for most of its 47 years — is to listen to the voices of women.
“The centrality of women’s voices in establishing NPR’s distinctive sound serves as important context for thinking about the cultural and political significance of the network today. Given the unprecedented role that gender politics played in the last election, it might be worthwhile to reflect on the role of women’s voices in making public radio so threatened and, perhaps, threatening.”

How to bathe like an 18th-century queen.

Related: The 5 things that turned me into a shower lover.

Thank you (Yes you!) cards.

I planned my wedding in 5 days. You could, too.

A brief history of men getting credit for women’s accomplishments.

P.S. I’d like to start sharing a few links throughout the week, too. Follow Finding Delight on Facebook so you won’t miss out! 

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mid-week round-up

Hello my beautiful friends! Today marks my THIRD day in a row of waking up at 5 am. (How do you every-day early-risers DO IT?) These early rise times have been to facilitate a pretty mind-numbing project so maybe it’s less about 5 am and more about all the work in the hours that follow. But either way, I’m totally zonked. Wednesday tho, amirite!? WE GOT THIS! Here are some links to help keep your eyes pried open ’til the weekend…

The surprisingly interesting story behind the filet-o-fish sandwich. (<–You know it is Lent when…)

Here’s what a food blogger actually eats in a day.

Photographer Omar Robles’ portraits capture dancers en pointe in San Juan.

This Kentucky Forecast t-shirt made me laugh.

SOOOO relateable re: small(er) town living has perks and big cities can be a sorta nightmare.
“i can’t deal with traffic anymore. or people. or pretty much anything that takes longer than five minutes and doesn’t move its mindlessly texting ass out of the way. i thought i was committed to being a city person but i’ve been in both new york and los angeles for work (LOL) over the past few months and rather than being like “hooray! look at all of the expensive juice options laid before me!” i’ve instead found myself thinking “shit, have there always been this many people on earth?”

A purse with TWO pom-poms so it can be your personal cheerleader.

Related: Gift ideas for  sisters, girlfriends, best friends, wives and any other lady loves!

The next scientific breakthrough could come from the history books.

Researchers uncover a regional distinction in American Sign Language, and seek to preserve it.

Once hunted to near extinction, Europe’s great egrets take refuge along the Danube.

101 small ways you can improve your city.

I always end up sleeping in gym shorts and t-shirts but I’m considering an upgrade.

Pumping iron with Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s personal trainer is no joke.
“Asked earlier this month about the most important person in her life, Ginsburg, who was widowed in 2010 and lost a close friend with the 2016 death of Justice Antonin Scalia, responded, “My personal trainer.” That would be Bryant Johnson, 52. You could think of Johnson’s sturdy limbs as a fourth branch of government, grafted onto the judiciary, keeping it aloft.”

P.S. A few Finding Delight posts you may have missed — Found! The Greatest Exercise Video Ever and Must-Haves for Sleeping in the Heat.

mid-week round-up

rob-bye-182304

What have you been up to, my dears? This past weekend my dear friend Adam came to town! We enjoyed delicious food, lounged by the pool, and spent a day at the beach. It was so nice to have him here, and it makes me wish we lived in the same city…or at least a little closer. I finished this book while we were at the beach. I’m feeling compelled to learn more about circus before the final Ringling shows draw to a close this year. But enough about going to the beach in February (!), here are some links from around the web…

The forgotten history of “The Oregon Trail,” as told by its creators.
“I remember watching 7th and 8th grade kids improve in reading. Their “lives” depended on it.”

My husband sent me this link and said, “You’re denying the reality.” #TeamRinse

Stop apologizing for the pop culture you love.

The hidden history of the laundry chute.

How racism harms pregnant women — and what can help.
“And so we come back to the path from discrimination to stress to poor health, and it begins to paint a picture that many people of color know to be true: racism is actually making us sick. Still sound like a stretch? Consider this: immigrants, particularly black and Latina immigrants, actually have better health when they first arrive in the United States. But the longer they stay in this country, the worse their health becomes.”

My favorite way to take my vitamins.

“Arthur said he was a 23-year-old Belgian orphan. He wasn’t, but he was a good companion.” 

RuPaul’s Drag Empire is built on a foundation of humor.

Genius.

Inside the case that could protect homeless people against unwarranted police searches.

Immigrant mother in Denver takes refuge as threat of deportation looms.

Wouldn’t dinners at home feel extra special if you set out a bread basket with a few warm slices?

P.S. A few Finding Delight posts you may have missed — Recipe: Cheesy Cauliflower and Book Review: The Newlyweds by Nell Freudenberger.

mid-week round-up

fire-escape-street

Welcome to 2017, my friends! Gah! How futuristic does THAT sound? I hope you’re all doing well and settling into the new year with ease. Did you make any resolutions? Set any new intentions? I’d like to develop some new organizational systems (paperwork, computer files, my planner…all these Christmas decorations that need to come down eventually, lol) and decrease time spent in front of screens. I’m also kick-starting my year with daily yoga videos from Adriene. (LOVE her January challenges!) Now, if reading more random internet articles was a resolution of yours, I’ve got ya covered… But you can feel free to click through even if it wasn’t…

Adding Chris Bohjalian’s book The Sleepwalker to my 2017 reading list.

Glamour just published it’s first issue produced completely by women. It’s about time.

This stamp set from Concord & 9th makes the sweetest DIY cards for winter.

Sherman Alexie, Lindy West, and Ta-Nehisi Coates all quit Twitter this week.

Would you paint your walls blush?

There’s a massive restaurant industry bubble, and it’s about to burst.

Death on the hippie trail.

The introvert’s travel bucket list for 2017.

Yoga may not be scientifically valid, but it works for me.

Diaries shed new light on siege of Leningrad.

The little-known link between Princess Leia’s iconic hairstyle and the Mexican Revolution.

*shrugs* Shit happens.

mid-week round-up

white-pumpkins

How’s everyone doing today? Honestly, I still feel like I’m in shock. My mixed bag of emotions includes sadness, disbelief, anger, and grief for what could have been.

But I also feel an overwhelming love for the people in this country, especially my friends and family who now face the very real possibility that hardship awaits. I believe we can all do good in spite of the roadblock we’ve found ourselves up against. I believe we can claim the power in our own lives to effect change and help others. This love and these beliefs are what I’m clinging to.

Today, I’m bummed…because I really, really, really wanted a woman in The White House. I’m mourning for our country and how it would have felt to have her, despite facing a loud-mouthed male opponent, come out on top. I was counting so much on the tears I would shed for her victory that I never considered the tears I would shed for us all if she lost.

Tomorrow, the fight continues.

Here are some links pertaining to last night’s results…

A transcript of Donald Trump’s victory speech.

The electorate has, in its plurality, decided to live in Trump’s world.

This is how much America hates women.

What will I tell my children? 

Feeling homeless in America.

How the future voted.

“To all the little girls…never doubt that you are valuable and powerful & deserving of every chance and opportunity in the world.”Hillary Clinton

And here are a dozen non-election links, if you’re in need of a diversion…

A trove of historical gold from the attics and shoeboxes of Virginia.

Prince Michael Jackson can’t sing or dance.

Stanford sexual assault case survivor speaks out.

Samantha Bee condemns Catholic hospitals.

Watched this documentary recently and would highly recommend.

A swoon-worthy light fixture, if you’re in the market.

Is Barbara Bush four feet tall? Siri thinks so.

Lindsay Lohan NEVER disappoints.

‘Afghan Girl’ is arrested in Pakistan.

Female medical detective is such a bad-ass job title tho.

How to deal with jet lag.

Such a sweet story.

mid-week round-up

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Happy MY birthday to all of YOU! I have a ton to do today to get ready for our trip to Louisiana (!!!), but I thought I’d pop on to do a quick mid-week round-up. Posting will probably be sporadic or non-existent for the next few days as we have a lot to cram into our short trip. Never fear! I’ll be back soon with pictures and lots of great, new content.

I love you guys! Thanks for hanging out in my corner of the internet. I’m incredibly grateful for your support. (And if you’re new here, welcome!) I’m a year older, a year wiser, and so excited to embark on my next journey ’round the sun. xoxo

Nicholas Kristof live tweets the second presidential debate.

What can you learn about someone from seeing their bedroom?

Inside the New York Public Library’s last, secret apartments.

Kate Middleton’s expressive face is the main reason I love her.

The mystery of 1,000 missing and murdered indigenous women in Canada.

These earrings would make a pretty and feminine addition to a Fall wardrobe.

Hating Kim Kardashian is the most boring thing you can do.

Arranged marriages in the 1800’s.

The ballerinas who burned to death.

The most influential reality show in TV history. (I’ve been saying it for years!)

Public speaking hacks for scientists!

Germany reunified 26 years ago, but some divisions are still strong.

mid-week round-up

barn-roof

Happy Wednesday! What are y’all up to? We ran a bunch of errands yesterday in preparation for Hurricane Matthew, and today I’m brainstorming ways to entertain myself in the event we lose power. (Reading by candlelight? Knitting by flashlight?) Hopefully it doesn’t come to that but always good to be prepared! If you’re in the projected path, I hope you’re staying safe. Now, here are some links I found interesting, in case you’re in the mood…

Shirley Jackson wrote 17 books while raising 4 children — and she couldn’t have had a successful career without them.

Just one more reason to drink lots of wine before Christmas.

Novelists weigh in on cultural appropriation.

Imagine if Donald Trump were a woman.

A traditional cake for new mothers.

A beginner’s guide to meditation.

Jailed when her boyfriend killed her son, she is free at last.

Can clothes really open up a whole new world?

Young rural women in India chase big-city dreams.

The real reason 5 decades of women’s progress has stalled.

A fun Friday night once meant going to the velodrome to watch cyclists collide.

Irish people watch the presidential debate.

mid-week round-up

sunrise-over-a-field

What are you up to this week, friends? I’m hoping to head to the beach tomorrow and relax with some new library books (and maybe a margarita). It feels like Summer should be winding down but here in Miami the temperature tends to disagree. I have a feeling there’s still plenty of beach possibilities ahead. Also, I’m thrilled with how all our wedding posts have turned out. If you’d like to have a browse through all of them you can do so HERE. Thanks to everyone for being so sweet about my rampant over-sharing. Ok, now onto some links…

How Angelina Jolie continues to masterfully control the public narrative around her.

Where was this adorable fairy door when I was a kid?

Silicon Valley’s quest to make periods cool.

Tribes redraw land boundaries with GPS and a fleet of drones.

California might finally be cracking down on…cow farts.

Are we all just manic information addicts?

How Little House on the Prairie built modern conservatism. 

The unusual origins of pink lemonade.

Describing colors to the blind.

They say New York is over-photographed. He disagrees.

Scientific proof that Americans basically eat dessert for breakfast.

Is it still “diversity” or “inclusion” if no one is broke on TV?

Books to read if you’re in search of a history lesson…

In the final few weeks of wedding planning, my normally voracious appetite for reading books came to a squeaking halt. I packed The Devil in the White City with every good intention of diving in. Needless to say, it sat untouched in my backpack until Chet and I landed safely back in Miami. But once the post-wedding exhaustion wore off, and routines re-appeared, I couldn’t put this bad boy down. If you’re in search of a fascinating history lesson (along with a tale of a devious serial killer), I couldn’t recommend this book enough. And here are 4 other books that serve up a dose of history as well…

the devil in the white cityThe Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic and Madness at the Fair That Changed America by Erik Larson 

Erik Larson intertwines the true tale of the 1893 World’s Fair and the cunning serial killer who used the fair to lure his victims to their death. Combining meticulous research with nail-biting storytelling, Erik Larson has crafted a narrative with all the wonder of newly discovered history and the thrills of the best fiction.

A real peak into what life was like in America broadly, and the infamous “White City” specifically, as the 19th century drew to a fitful close.

 

the immortal life of henrietta lacks

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot

Her name was Henrietta Lacks, but scientists know her as HeLa. She was a poor black tobacco farmer whose cells—taken without her knowledge in 1951—became one of the most important tools in medicine, vital for developing the polio vaccine, cloning, gene mapping, and more. This phenomenal bestseller tells the story of the collision between ethics, race, and medicine.

Maps the grandiose history of modern science as well as the intimate history of an unknowing contribution.

 

the girls who went away

The Girls Who Went Away: The Hidden History of Women Who Surrendered Children for Adoption in the Decades Before Roe v. Wade by Ann Fessler

In this deeply moving and myth-shattering work, Ann Fessler brings out into the open the astonishing untold history of the million and a half women who surrendered children for adoption due to enormous family and social pressure in the decades before Roe v. Wade.

Examines the shame of getting pregnant in post-WW II USA, the lack of options and education women faced, and the agencies who profited from the results.

 

a walk in the woods

A Walk in the Woods: Rediscovering America on the Appalachian Trail by Bill Bryson
The Appalachian Trail trail  covers some of the most breathtaking terrain in America–majestic mountains, silent forests, sparking lakes. Bill Bryson introduces us to the history and ecology of the trail and to some of the hardy folks he meets along the way–and a couple of bears.

Hiking provides the backdrop to a sincere discourse on the social condition of America, local history, and environmental science.

 

 

the warmth of other suns The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America’s Great Migration by Isabel Wilkerson 

In this epic, beautifully written masterwork, Pulitzer Prize–winning author Isabel Wilkerson chronicles one of the great untold stories of American history: the decades-long migration of black citizens who fled the South for northern and western cities, in search of a better life.

Compiling over 10 years of research in more than 600 pages, this book takes on the biggest under-reported story of the twentieth century utilizing 1,200 interviews conducted personally by Wilkerson.

What books would YOU recommend for us history-lovin’ folk? Share below! 

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mid-week round-up

baby ducks

How’s it hanging, love-bugs? This time next week I’ll be in Lexington! I’m flying up a couple weeks before our wedding to finish out all the preparations while Chet stays behind to teach. The final count-down is upon us! Flying with my wedding dress makes me a tad anxious, I’ll be honest. But I’m SO excited to be back in Lexington for the first time in almost a year. In the meantime, there’s plenty of prep left to do here in SoFlo. And we’ll also be taking it easy just enjoying each other and quiet nights at home before the madness ensues! Hope your week is extra fun-filled, and here are a few links for your enjoyment…

No one is building the suburban homes Millennial buyers want.

10 ways to give your kids a 1970’s summer.

An inside look at Bulgaria’s controversial bride market.

Instagram hashtags to organically grow your following.

Kim Kardashian West: “Settling down allowed her to turn up.”

The polyamorous christian socialist utopia that made silverware for proper Americans.

How YouTube videos can help people cope with mental illness.

Licking intensified. (Reminds me of Wink.)

The mysterious vlogger who changed the internet.

A former crisis pregnancy center volunteer tells all.

Audrey Hepburn’s newly discovered love letters.

The 38 essential Miami restaurants.