Tag Archives: immigrant stories

mid-week round-up

What it do, baby-boos? Yesterday I brought back my favorite South Florida perk — the 2 p.m. break from work to to take a dip in the pool!!! Now I’m just struggle-bussin’ it through the last half of the work week when all I wanna do is drink boulevardiers, watch this docu-series on Netflix that everyone’s been raving about, and make pocket letters. Eeps! Weekend where are you??? Hope you’ve got some enticing weekend plans in mind, and here are a few links I found fascinating…

Why is there so much focus on no-platforming at elite universities, when hundreds of colleges across America regularly suppress speech?

Starting your day in a way that works for YOU.

Related: Don’t Hide Your Hustle – Lucy, Graphic Designer

The 33 most exciting new books of 2018.

The maternity care desert in Washington D.C.

A teenager told police all about his gang, MS-13. In return, he was slated for deportation and marked for death.

Gun fatalism is reasonable in a terrifying country.

Native American lacrosse teams reported racial abuse. Then their league expelled them.

Smashing guiding’s glass ceiling.

Related: On the Rooftop of the World

How women see how male authors see them.

As gentrification closes in, immigrants in Lincoln Heights see their American dream slipping away.

The weird true story of the rise and fall of the waterbed.

The most Instagrammed location in every state. (Summer road trip inspiration!!)

P.S. Follow me on Instagram. 

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mid-week round-up

I hope everyone had a wonderful 4th of July!!! Did you BBQ? Pop fireworks? Sing patriotic songs while you packed for upcoming travel?! *raises hand for that last one* I’m on my way to Kentucky today! I’ll be hanging out with my Mom for the next couple days and I can’t wait. (I have an embarrassingly long list of food you can only get in Lexington that I want to consume during my short visit.) Hope everyone’s day is peachy and here are a few links for your amusement…

Central Americans, scared of what’s happening in the U.S., stay put.

The U.S. already has a high quality, universal childcare program — in the military.

The problem with writing about Florida.

9 fun activities that also happen to be exercise.

Related: Ballin’ on a Budget — Ditch the Gym Membership

Monthly art projects sent to your door!

35 cheap recipes that will help you stick to your budget.

Related: How to Eat on a Shoestring Budget

Um, a 40 of ROSÉ? Yes, please!

Make the bread, buy the butter.

Ghostwriting for social media stars is the secret new Millennial It-career.

Long absent from discussions about employment, the retail workforce is taking matters into their own hands.

How to think about Bill Cosby and The Cosby Show.

Q&A: WTF is gut health? 

P.S. A few Finding Delight posts you may have missed — My Top 4 Healthy Lifestyle Intentions and TV Recommendation: Westworld.

mid-week round-up

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What have you been up to, my dears? This past weekend my dear friend Adam came to town! We enjoyed delicious food, lounged by the pool, and spent a day at the beach. It was so nice to have him here, and it makes me wish we lived in the same city…or at least a little closer. I finished this book while we were at the beach. I’m feeling compelled to learn more about circus before the final Ringling shows draw to a close this year. But enough about going to the beach in February (!), here are some links from around the web…

The forgotten history of “The Oregon Trail,” as told by its creators.
“I remember watching 7th and 8th grade kids improve in reading. Their “lives” depended on it.”

My husband sent me this link and said, “You’re denying the reality.” #TeamRinse

Stop apologizing for the pop culture you love.

The hidden history of the laundry chute.

How racism harms pregnant women — and what can help.
“And so we come back to the path from discrimination to stress to poor health, and it begins to paint a picture that many people of color know to be true: racism is actually making us sick. Still sound like a stretch? Consider this: immigrants, particularly black and Latina immigrants, actually have better health when they first arrive in the United States. But the longer they stay in this country, the worse their health becomes.”

My favorite way to take my vitamins.

“Arthur said he was a 23-year-old Belgian orphan. He wasn’t, but he was a good companion.” 

RuPaul’s Drag Empire is built on a foundation of humor.

Genius.

Inside the case that could protect homeless people against unwarranted police searches.

Immigrant mother in Denver takes refuge as threat of deportation looms.

P.S. A few Finding Delight posts you may have missed — Recipe: Cheesy Cauliflower and Book Review: The Newlyweds by Nell Freudenberger.

Book Review: The Newlyweds by Nell Freudenberger

the-newlywedsIn light of the recent immigration ban, reading stories of those who have navigated across cultures to a new life in the United States seems even more important. Even when those stories appear in the novel you turn to when you need a break from the world.

Stories, like the one found in The Newlyweds by Nell Freudenberger, humanize the immigrant experience. The book follows Amina Mazid who leaves her home in Bangladesh for a new life in New York. While her story is not one of religious persecution or civil war, she is in search of happiness. A different happiness than what she can find in Bangladesh. The same happiness so many are seeking when they step onto American soil. But like the immigrants before (and after) her, Amina must carve out a space for herself amidst her American reality and the other happiness she knew before. A home she can never forget.

Amina Mazid is twenty-four when she moves from Bangladesh to Rochester, New York, for love. A hundred years ago, Amina would have been called a mail-order bride. But this is the twenty-first century: she is wooed by—and woos—George Stillman online.
 
For Amina, George offers a chance for a new life for her and her parents, as well as a different kind of happiness than she might find back home. For George, Amina is a woman who doesn’t play games. But each of them is hiding something: someone from the past they thought they could leave behind. It is only when Amina returns to Bangladesh that she and George find out if their secrets will tear them apart, or if they can build a future together.

At it’s core, this book is a rather nuanced portrait of a young woman’s transition from one culture to another. This theme reminded me of another great book, The Namesake by Jhumpa Lahiri. And I think fan’s of Lahiri’s work will also find value in picking up a copy of The Newlyweds.

Freudenberger shows an immense depth of knowledge about Bangladesh, it’s culture, and Islam. The acknowledgements section of the book makes it clear that she did her research by way of extensive interviews and immersive travel to the country itself. (Even more amazing? This research, and the subsequent novel, was inspired by a Bangladeshi woman Freudenberger met on a plane! #talktostrangers)

However, there is a note of inauthenticity to the story, most notably the character of Amina herself. Freudenberger explains the duality that I’m sure many immigrants experience…

“[Amina] had thought that she’d been born with a soul whose thoughts were in no particular dialect, and she’d imagined that, when she married, her husband would be able to recognize this deep part of herself. Of course she hadn’t counted on her husband being a foreigner…In a way, George had created her American self, and so it made sense that it was the only one he would see.”

And perhaps it is this duality, which Freudenberger explains but hasn’t experienced, that makes Amina’s character lack just an inkling of depth. Because, at the end of the day, Amina’s husband George didn’t create her American self, the author did.

The story itself is captivating and full of suspense. It is an entertaining depiction of the effects of honesty (or lack thereof) on relationships and navigating cross-cultural experiences. Check it out! 

Have you read The Newlyweds? Would you? Let me know below!

P.S. Books to read if you love the Commonwealth and a book I could NOT put down.