Tag Archives: marriage

mid-week round-up

crocodile in the grass

What’s up? How’s everyone doing? My birthday was on Friday and I had a wonderful weekend of celebrating. It finally felt like TRUE Fall so all celebrations were appropriately autumnal — read: apple orchard visits, pumpkin pie baking, grilled brats, and Oktoberfest beers. Hope y’all are enjoying the season as much as I am! Now, here are a few links I found for your enjoyment…

What the daughter of a psychic learned from her mom.

Serious #HomeGoals (and it’s in Alabama!).

Related: Empty House Tour

I’ll take one of each, please!

Retail workers are more vulnerable than ever.

The ghosts of the glacier.

Thinking ahead to Christmas pocket letters.

Related: A Spring-Themed Pocket Letter

The love story that upended the Texas prison system.

She was 16. He was 25. Should marrying a child be allowed? 

Related: An (Un)arranged Marriage

High school students are tackling Kentucky’s mental health crisis.

Steve Carell aged like a fine wine. 🙂

Myth busting Banksy.

This chocolate bark sounds yummy.

and episode 6 of Uncovered the Podcast (featuring a popular Lady Gaga conspiracy theory and info about a cult lead by 90’s hunk Andrew Keegan!)

P.S. A few Finding Delight posts you may have missed — Chocolate Zucchini Muffins and The 5 Things That Turned Me Into a Shower Lover.

P.P.S. If you love my weekly links and would like to support my sweet blog (thank you!)–click HERE.

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3 Tips for Brides-To-Be

3 tips for brides to-be

Planning a wedding can be incredibly overwhelming. For one thing, there’s a TON of wedding advice online detailing all the things a bride “must” do. And then there’s a whole host of other folks IRL who will happily weigh in with their opinions.

How many traditions can there be for ONE day? Do we have to complete every DIY from that “Happily ever after…” Pinterest board? Why does everyone want to make this about THEM!? AAAAH!

It’s enough to make a gal wanna call the whole thing off and head for the courthouse! But I believe everyone can plan the wedding of their dreams . Sometimes it just takes a little bit of strategizing…

So, for all my brides-to-be out there, here are my 3 favorite tips to help you cut through all the noise: 

  • Use traditions as a gentle guide not a do-or-die road map. You can have that walk-down-the-aisle moment of your childhood fantasies without needing to be escorted by a parent. You can cut your cake or not. Your first dance can be in the midst of your ceremony. Talk to your partner about what traditions are important to you, which you’d rather skip, and if there’s room for adaptation. You get to create your own version of the day. 

 

  • Choose three financial priorities. If you’re planning a wedding on a budget, figure out your priorities before diving in with checkbook in tow. Once you’ve picked your big three, you’ll have a clearer picture of what elements you feel ok splurging on and which you can DIY. For example, music didn’t rank in our top three priorities so we went for an mp3 player plugged into a rented speaker to jam our reception playlist. However, if it ranks in yours, you may want to hire a professional DJ or a local string quartet. I wanted a bouquet made by a local florist but if this detail is something you’d rather save on then, by all means, hit up that Pinterest board girlfriend. 

 

  • Find ways to involve family and friends that go beyond a wedding party. Sure you may want to have your nearest and dearest standing beside you as you proclaim your love, but I’m guessing these folks have a fair few talents besides looking pretty in pictures. The pieces of your big day will hold so much more sentimentality if they were constructed by the people who love you.  Ask them to do a reading or MC or braid your hair or help you pick out table runners. If folks in your life are chiming in with a whole bunch of opinions, they’re likely coming from a good place–they might just be unsure of how to help. Give them a role to fill!

 

At the end of the day, wedding’s will never go completely as planned. There will be some detail that completely slips your mind…a last minute change or addition you didn’t plan for. But by choosing meaningful traditions, spending on the details most important to you (and saving on all the rest), and getting your nearest and dearest involved–your big day is sure to be a beautiful success!

This post was sponsored by BBBGEM, a custom jewelry store whose white gold wedding bands, morganite wedding sets, and rose gold moissanite engagement rings are nothing short of stunning. Thanks for supporting the brands that support FINDING DELIGHT! xoxo

(Photo above: Sur La Lune Photography)

Our Cotton Anniversary Couch (+ a 2nd Anniversary Gift Idea Round-Up)

cotton anniversary couch

Hey friends! Chet and I recently celebrated our SECOND YEAR of marriage and we marked the occasion with a….couch?! That’s right, in honor of our 2nd anniversary we replaced our old (and very worn) Ikea number and got the absolute BABE of a sofa pictured above. I mean it IS fabric and there’s probably some cotton in there somewhere, right? (IDK I’m not a textile expert or anything.)

I’m still a far way off from the entryway of my dreams as you can see above, but I just had to share this lil home decor update anyways. So in love with this couch, you guys!

[Related: Check out all my posts about our wedding HERE.]

couch leg on the corner of a rug(Please disregard the staple that was left behind from the packaging which I carelessly forgot to remove because I was too excited but thankfully got rid of before it impaled anyone’s ankles, AHEM!)

I also gifted Chet with a pair of shoes and he got me 5 lovely hosta seedlings that we planted in our backyard along the house. Year 2 was pretty terrific!

Now, in honor of this marriage milestone, I thought I’d round-up a few “Cotton Anniversary” gift ideas. (Just in case you’re not buying the whole couch as cotton option, lol!)

 

2nd Anniversary Gift Ideas:

Pajamas,
Neck Tie or Scarf,
Bathrobes,
Apron,
Hammock,
Plant Hanger,
Throw Blanket,
Table Cloth and Napkins,
Decorative Pillows,
Bed Sheets,
or Your Wedding Vows Printed on Cotton Paper.

Have you celebrated any fun milestones lately? How did you mark the occasion? 

mid-week round-up

rob-bye-182304

What have you been up to, my dears? This past weekend my dear friend Adam came to town! We enjoyed delicious food, lounged by the pool, and spent a day at the beach. It was so nice to have him here, and it makes me wish we lived in the same city…or at least a little closer. I finished this book while we were at the beach. I’m feeling compelled to learn more about circus before the final Ringling shows draw to a close this year. But enough about going to the beach in February (!), here are some links from around the web…

The forgotten history of “The Oregon Trail,” as told by its creators.
“I remember watching 7th and 8th grade kids improve in reading. Their “lives” depended on it.”

My husband sent me this link and said, “You’re denying the reality.” #TeamRinse

Stop apologizing for the pop culture you love.

The hidden history of the laundry chute.

How racism harms pregnant women — and what can help.
“And so we come back to the path from discrimination to stress to poor health, and it begins to paint a picture that many people of color know to be true: racism is actually making us sick. Still sound like a stretch? Consider this: immigrants, particularly black and Latina immigrants, actually have better health when they first arrive in the United States. But the longer they stay in this country, the worse their health becomes.”

My favorite way to take my vitamins.

“Arthur said he was a 23-year-old Belgian orphan. He wasn’t, but he was a good companion.” 

RuPaul’s Drag Empire is built on a foundation of humor.

Genius.

Inside the case that could protect homeless people against unwarranted police searches.

Immigrant mother in Denver takes refuge as threat of deportation looms.

P.S. A few Finding Delight posts you may have missed — Recipe: Cheesy Cauliflower and Book Review: The Newlyweds by Nell Freudenberger.

Book Review: The Newlyweds by Nell Freudenberger

the-newlywedsIn light of the recent immigration ban, reading stories of those who have navigated across cultures to a new life in the United States seems even more important. Even when those stories appear in the novel you turn to when you need a break from the world.

Stories, like the one found in The Newlyweds by Nell Freudenberger, humanize the immigrant experience. The book follows Amina Mazid who leaves her home in Bangladesh for a new life in New York. While her story is not one of religious persecution or civil war, she is in search of happiness. A different happiness than what she can find in Bangladesh. The same happiness so many are seeking when they step onto American soil. But like the immigrants before (and after) her, Amina must carve out a space for herself amidst her American reality and the other happiness she knew before. A home she can never forget.

Amina Mazid is twenty-four when she moves from Bangladesh to Rochester, New York, for love. A hundred years ago, Amina would have been called a mail-order bride. But this is the twenty-first century: she is wooed by—and woos—George Stillman online.
 
For Amina, George offers a chance for a new life for her and her parents, as well as a different kind of happiness than she might find back home. For George, Amina is a woman who doesn’t play games. But each of them is hiding something: someone from the past they thought they could leave behind. It is only when Amina returns to Bangladesh that she and George find out if their secrets will tear them apart, or if they can build a future together.

At it’s core, this book is a rather nuanced portrait of a young woman’s transition from one culture to another. This theme reminded me of another great book, The Namesake by Jhumpa Lahiri. And I think fan’s of Lahiri’s work will also find value in picking up a copy of The Newlyweds.

Freudenberger shows an immense depth of knowledge about Bangladesh, it’s culture, and Islam. The acknowledgements section of the book makes it clear that she did her research by way of extensive interviews and immersive travel to the country itself. (Even more amazing? This research, and the subsequent novel, was inspired by a Bangladeshi woman Freudenberger met on a plane! #talktostrangers)

However, there is a note of inauthenticity to the story, most notably the character of Amina herself. Freudenberger explains the duality that I’m sure many immigrants experience…

“[Amina] had thought that she’d been born with a soul whose thoughts were in no particular dialect, and she’d imagined that, when she married, her husband would be able to recognize this deep part of herself. Of course she hadn’t counted on her husband being a foreigner…In a way, George had created her American self, and so it made sense that it was the only one he would see.”

And perhaps it is this duality, which Freudenberger explains but hasn’t experienced, that makes Amina’s character lack just an inkling of depth. Because, at the end of the day, Amina’s husband George didn’t create her American self, the author did.

The story itself is captivating and full of suspense. It is an entertaining depiction of the effects of honesty (or lack thereof) on relationships and navigating cross-cultural experiences. Check it out! 

Have you read The Newlyweds? Would you? Let me know below!

P.S. Books to read if you love the Commonwealth and a book I could NOT put down.