Let’s Talk About My Dry Scalp

You guys. I am so ready for Spring. But for sort of a weird (and embarrassing) reason…

My disgustingly dry scalp!

Now, I have a pretty dry scalp year-round but I find that it’s a bit more manageable in the warmer seasons. Which was great in Miami! Warm year-round. But moving up to Alabama? This minor (major to me, but PERSPECTIVE lol) annoyance came back with a vengeance as soon as temperatures started to dip below 65.

I feel like I’ve tried lots of remedies to no avail. It seems ridiculous to spend a bunch of money on every possibility under the sun when I know the tides will turn come May. (But I did cut my own hair this winter because I didn’t want to hear another hairdresser tell me, “Your scalp is so dry!” Oh REALLY?! Wow, I hadn’t noticed.)

I promise this post isn’t just me complaining. Ok, it mostly is. But I’d love to know if this is something you’ve dealt with. Do you have any remedies? What works for you? Any hair care routines or products you swear by (dry scalp or not)? Below are some of the things I’ve tried or still use regularly because they keep things in check in warmer months, as well as things I’ve been recommended before that I still need to try.

Over the years, I’ve tried:

T/Sal and T/Gel

Avalon Organics Tea Tree Shampoo and Conditioner

Tea Tree Oil

Coconut Leave-In Conditioner

Biolage Shampoo

and these are on my list:

Argan Oil

Tea Tree Hair and Scalp Treatment

Shampoo Brush (like this one or this one)

JASON Normalizing Shampoo

Davines Purifying Shampoo

This book, which is up next in the Finding Delight book club (!!!) says dry scalp can be a symptom of hormone imbalance so I’ll be exploring that further. I’ll keep y’all updated…not that you NEED to remain abreast on the sordid detail of my dry scalp saga, but maybe you want to! 😉

P.S. My favorite hairbrush and that time I wore extensions.

If you enjoy my blog content, please consider supporting what I do (and keeping me caffeinated). Thank you! xoxo ☕

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5 Ways Health & Traveling Abroad Go Hand in Hand

* This post may contain affiliate links.

You’re going away on a long trip, which means one thing: healthy habits are taking a backseat. The thought of spending a couple months traveling the world is incredible but it’s also not great for the body, right? After all, you’ll be eating and drinking whatever you like with little to zero exercise. Put these together and it’s easy to see why your health may take a hit.

However, the truth is that travel and well-being go hand in hand as long as you can approach both from the right place and are willing to try new things. If you’re curious, here are five reasons to consider.

Less Calorific Diet

A standard American diet includes lots of carbs and refined sugars, both of which aren’t so great for the body when eaten in large quantities. But, that’s not the norm when looking at other cuisines around the world. Take Asia as an example. In the likes of Vietnam and Japan, the locals slurp down delicious soups. Or, there is Thailand where the spicy curries speed up metabolism while tasting amazing. In Brazil, the mix of rice and beans create a perfect protein without a piece of meat touching your plate.

The point is that you’ll eat like a queen without having to worry because you won’t be consuming all the empty calories we’ve gotten used to here in the States. Just remember, wherever you are, eat like a local!

More Active

Going to the gym four times a week doesn’t make you active. It means you like working out, yet your lifestyle may not be very busy other than your exercise regime. Do you sit in front of the TV a lot and do nothing? Do you spend a lot of time sitting on a chair behind a desk staring at a screen? If the answers are yes, you’re living a fairly sedentary life.

Traveling is the solution because there is no time to sit back and relax. From the early morning to the late evening, there is plenty to see and do. Not only will you constantly be on the move, but the likelihood is you’ll be doing a TON of walking. Let’s not forget about the amenities either. In hotels, guests have access to the gym and it’s complimentary. As well as excellent machines, there is a laid back atmosphere as there aren’t hundreds of people vying for the same equipment. 

Plenty Of Z’s

In a nutshell, sleep is the solution to health. When you get plenty of rest, the body gets to recover from the day before and plan for the day ahead. As well as a boost to your metabolism, there are mental health impacts too. For example, tiredness could prevent you from working out or lead you to swap out a healthy meal for an unhealthy one.

Although it’s tempting to think sleep is easy to come by at home, it’s not always the case. Sure, the bed is comfy and it might not be as noisy in your bedroom, yet you’re still on the clock. Maintaining a regular lifestyle means you need to get up to eat breakfast and get off to work on time. Traveling is all about what you want to do and when, so if you fancy a sleep in, it’s not a problem. There’s no reason to lie in bed until the early afternoon, but an extra hour may be the difference between feeling tired and refreshed.

Healthcare Options

America is infamous for its privatized healthcare system. Without insurance, it’s often difficult to get the treatment you need. So what happens if you’re abroad and your health takes a turn for the worse? Our neighbors around the world don’t share the same values about turning away folks without coverage–and many times treatment is free. Yep, it’s the case even if you’re visiting the country on a tourist visa. In the UK, the NHS will help anyone who needs urgent care so there’s no reason to worry.

Also, there are surgeries which are performed abroad that aren’t as common or accessible here. Cosmetic surgery is widely available across the globe for half the price, and it’s not a hatchet job. (Any nose surgery video will put your mind at ease.) Mental health-wise, there are many great services out there these days, like BetterHelp and TalkSpace, that allow you to meet with a therapist remotely.

The Drinking Culture

Okay, you’re on vacation. It’s not surprising that you’ll want to spend time drinking, partying, and meeting new people. This doesn’t mean travel and health can’t still co-exist. You want to be able to enjoy yourself…and maybe throw a few shapes on the dance floor. However, the way many folks approach alcohol consumption in America just won’t cut it elsewhere. 

We tend not to have a beverage all week and then let loose at the weekend. Like, really let loose. Go ahead and forget this culture of binge drinking as soon as you board the plane. The good news is that other countries drink alcohol differently. Share a few beers at the pub with your new friends. Have a glass of wine with your dinner. Don’t limit yourself to the weekend and you probably won’t end up in an all out binge-fest. Enjoy a drink each evening (that you want to) and really take your time to enjoy it. You’ll take pleasure in the atmosphere and the process way more than the drink itself. And you won’t wake up with a headache!

How do you stay healthy while traveling? What hacks have helped you in the past?

P.S. Is packing in a 19 liter backpack possible for winter travel?

Is packing in a 19 liter backpack possible for winter travel?

As you know from this post, last month I took a weekend trip to Florida with my husband. But a few weeks later, I had to travel again. This time, I was headed north to Ohio. The circumstances weren’t as happy (it was for a funeral of a loved one) and the travel arrangements were very last minute. On the first trip, I had no problem planning and packing in my 19 liter Tom Bihn backpack. I had time to strategize and I was traveling to a warm climate. But for my last minute flight to Ohio? I threw everything into my husband’s Tom Bihn Aeronaut 30. He usually carries it as a duffel but I strapped on the backpack attachments (and probably looked like I was headed to a month of hostel-hopping). 30 whole liters? The luxury!

At the time, I didn’t want to put a lot of extra thought into packing. I just wanted to get there. I also knew I would need warm clothes for the snowy conditions, a dressy outfit, laptops and books for trying to work (and entertainment in case of any flight delays/cancellations). If you’re looking for a one-bag travel situation but need to cram in a suitcase worth of stuff, I HIGHLY recommend the Tom Bihn Aeronaut 30 (there’s also a 45). Especially if you, like me, prefer hauling stuff on your back. (Listen. I’m not saying it’s because I can pee without putting all my stuff down but I’m not NOT saying it’s because of that, ok?) In a pinch, this bag will fit under the seat in front of you and it slides right into the overhead bin…that person with the dreaded luggage tags won’t even give you a second glance if they see all you have is a backpack.

winter packing 19 liter backpack

But…

Because I’m a packing nerd….

and I LOVE a challenge….

As I daydreamed away an hour in the Charlotte airport (hi delays!), I started thinking about how I would pack for winter travel in my 19 liter. So, here are the tips I came up with…

1. Travel in bulky outerwear

This one’s a no-brainer, but perhaps it bears repeating. Do I hate having to pull off a coat, an oversized cardigan, winter boots, a beanie, and a blanket scarf at airport security? ABSO-freakin’-lutely! But will I be glad to have these items when I reach my snowy destination? YES! Save space in your small backpack and pack these much-needed winter items on your body instead.

2. Find a pair of comfy pants that can do double duty

I have a small and mighty collection of comfy pants that feel like pajamas, but when paired with the right items, look down-right dressy. If I were packing for a winter trip in my 19L, I would consider traveling in a pair of these and then also use them as lounge/sleep-wear.

3. Fleece-lined tights make dresses possible

One way to cut down on the bulk of a bunch of clothes is to pack one-and-done outfits. I love packing dresses for travel because it’s just one piece of clothing you have to worry about and *bam* you have an outfit! Now, you might be saying, “Is this really a practical solution in the winter months?” And to that I respond — Helloooo?! Have you ever tried fleece-lined tights? Throw a pair of those on under your dress and rock your boots and cardigan and there ya go! Bonus: These can also be used as a long-underwear option underneath your trousers or the comfy pants mentioned above.

4. Choose boots as your one shoe option

A benefit of my bigger bag was that I traveled in a pair of heeled boots but also brought along some casual slip-ons. This is less of an option when you’re traveling super light. So, pick a versatile pair of boots (I would have definitely nixed my heels) that you can rock with any outfit. Because your feet will thank you, consider throwing in a pair of slippers or slipper socks that you can pad around in during the evenings. They pack down super small and some hotels are just too sketchy for bare feet, ya dig?

5. Sweaters/Thermals before multiple layers

While normally I’m all about traveling with a bunch of mix-and-match layers, that’s not as feasible when you’re combining cold weather clothing and a teeny-tiny carry on. Consider pullover sweaters and thermal long-sleeve shirts instead. Throw a couple of those in your packing cube (you can always wear them under the big cardigan you’re wearing on the plane, if it’s mega cold!) and call it a day. These, plus a pair of trousers, your comfy pants, a dress, fleece-lined tights, and your cardigan will form your on-the-go winter capsule wardrobe!

Do you have any tips and tricks for traveling light in the colder months? Leave ’em below!

P.S. 7 things that totally changed my air travel game!

If you enjoy my blog content, please consider supporting what I do (and keeping me caffeinated). Thank you! xoxo ☕

Book Club: Confessions of a Secular Jesus Follower Pt. 4

Welcome back, Finding Delight Book Club members! Today is my final post about Confessions of a Secular Jesus Follower, and I’m turning it over to you. While it is great to read other people’s thoughts about a book and learn a bit more about an author and dive deeper into a subject with extended reading/listening watching … what I love most about book clubs is that it allows a space for tapping into your own feelings about a book and what it brings up for YOU. Sometimes this can be difficult when reading books by yourself. You read for entertainment and enjoyment, maybe you underline a passage that speaks to you or remark YAS! to a sentence that really rings true. But in a book club? We can dig a little deeper. So, shall we?

confessions of a secular jesus follower tom krattenmaker reflection questions

1. In Confessions of a Secular Jesus Follower, Krattenmaker clearly knows his stuff when it comes to the Jesus presented in the New Testament. He recounts many stories and offers a secular spin.

How well do you know Jesus? What stories of him, from Scripture, do you remember? Do you have a favorite?

2. Historically, churches, synagogues, mosques and temples served an invaluable role as a place where emotional and spiritual needs were met and where a sense of purpose was established. With the move away from organized religion, these needs and purpose are often cared for elsewhere.

Where would you say these needs are met and purpose established for you? 

3. Jesus has been held captive by a nationalistic culture of white, middle-class, anglo-centric, mostly male people. Yet, he was born with darker skin, was from the lower class, had a male body but a seemingly female soul and often voiced disdain for religion. He lived between east and west. The only thing he excluded was exclusion itself.

What do you struggle with including in your circle of love and acceptance? How might you work towards being more inclusive?

4. Jesus said, “Live by the sword, die by the sword.” The early Church actually forbid membership to soldiers. And yet countless people of faith have fought and died believing a a “just war policy” that simply was not of Jesus’ thinking.

Is it possible to end violence and war? What might that transformation look like?

5. Marie Kondo is gaining immense popularity right now for her clear the clutter that fails to bring joy philosophy. This book really highlighted for me the similarities between her take and Jesus’, who reminds us that there is enough for everyone to have all they need.  We tend to be hoarders rather than distributors of our wealth.

How might you better meet the needs of others? How might you share your wealth? What do you think it will feel like if you give some stuff away?
*Note: Krattenmaker’s interpretation of the loaves and fishes story would be a wonderful section to revisit before taking on decluttering projects! What do you think?

6. Isolation, depression, and anxiety are at epidemic levels in our country today. Much of this stems from a feeling that no one cares, no one gets me, there is no one. Jesus was all about radical hospitality so that everyone cares, everyone gets me, there is everyone. So, your challenge today is to make contact with people – chat with a cashier, make eye contact and smile at a homeless person, check in with a family member you haven’t spoken to in awhile (actually talk, no texting). And then come back and reflect on how it  felt.

Who benefited most from these encounters? How might you incorporate these little actions into your everyday life?

7. You read the statistics – we are an Incarceration Nation.

What would it look like to offer restorative justice rather than retributive justice (locking everyone up) in our society? Where might this begin?

8. The author asks a very good question, “Were he suddenly inserted into our time and place, were he to behold our structural racism and all the other forms of injustice borne by one group or another, what would Jesus have us do?”

Thoughts? 

9. Let’s talk about non-dual thinking or living with paradox. Many hear this and think of eastern religions. But Jesus was also a non-dual thinker. That means sometimes there is no right or wrong, this or that, my way or no way. Sometimes both are right, my way and your way. It’s about coming to the conversation with an open mind.

Can you think of someone you strongly disagree with? Do you know that person’s whole story? Have you really listened to that person’s reasoning without judgment? Could you have that conversation? If not, why not?

10. Lunatic, Liar or Lord? Time to brainstorm some more L words that might describe Jesus. One I love – LOVE.

Your turn. 

Have you read Confessions of a Secular Jesus Follower yet? Pop any answers or thoughts that come up out of the exercises above in the comments. I’d love to continue the conversation. If you haven’t read it yet, but your interest is sparked, you can order it HERE or check it out from your local library. These posts will be here for you at any time — 

Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 |

So, what’s next for our book club? Subscribe HERE to receive the full Finding Delight Reading List or tune in next week for PART 1 of a brand new book. 🙂

❤ Thank you to my mom and sister for their help with this series. Grateful to be part of a family that loves and encourages reading! ❤

If you enjoy my blog content, please consider supporting what I do (and keeping me caffeinated). Thank you! xoxo ☕

mid-week round-up

What’s everyone up to? Last week was my grandma’s funeral in Ohio. While the occasion was certainly not a happy one, it was nice to spend some time with my family for a few days. As soon as I arrived back in Alabama, Chet had to leave for a work conference. Now we’re settling back in to routines after a hectic stretch of days, and welcoming the little glimpses of Spring. The sun has finally returned after what felt like weeks of rain (seriously, our yard looked like a little lake!) and Mardi Gras is right around the corner. Have a great Wednesday, and for your reading pleasure, a dozen links…

Beautiful bohemian interiors that are perfect inspo for a spring home decor refresh.

How a recipe goes viral on Instagram.

Students are going on strike to demand action on climate change, in a movement led almost entirely by teenage girls.

This llama tote makes me smile.

The Art of Leaving sounds like an amazing memoir.

Show them what crazy dreams can do.

Great advice: no more zero days.

How people spent sudden financial windfalls.

Living and working in 350 square feet. Love how light and feminine this space is!

Raffi is singing new songs and fighting new fascists. (Remember ‘Baby Beluga’?!)

Have you tried the 20/20/20?

How an internet obsession resurrected a long-lost Sesame Street cartoon.

P.S. A few Finding Delight posts you may have missed — Five Great Graphic Novels and 6 Reasons You Should Be Sleeping More.

If you enjoy my blog content, please consider supporting what I do (and keeping me caffeinated). Thank you! xoxo ☕

5 YouTube Meal Preps

meal prep inspiration youtube

Hi Friends! Quick question — Do you meal prep? Meal prepping, or preparing meals and ingredients ahead of time, is the stuff of Instagram legends and Pinterest queens. But if you’re wanting to make specific food choices and save some serious dough, prepping meals ahead of time is awesome. Even for us regular folks who aren’t capturing it all on our phone’s camera roll.

(Bonus: Make your food decisions ONE TIME instead of multiple times a day…brain space FTW!) 

One of my favorite places to turn for meal prep inspiration? YOUTUBE! Below are five different preps suitable for a variety of lifestyles. Check ’em out!

For when you only have an hour….

For when you are on a budget….

For when you want to bring your lunch to work….

For when you want a versatile plan to repeat every week….

For when you prep for the whole family….

Which would you try? I’d love to hear your thoughts! xoxo

P.S. 7 YouTube channels to check out for capsule wardrobe inspiration!

Book Club: Confessions of a Secular Jesus Follower Pt. 3

Last week, we learned a bit more about the man behind Confessions of a Secular Jesus Follower. (Well, the author, Tom Krattenmaker. Not Jesus. LOL) I shared some of his other work, and a few interviews, which hopefully placed the book in the broader context of why Krattenmaker, again and again, finds himself turning to the figure of Jesus.

Today, I’d like to widen the horizons of that context even further and offer some extended reading. Perhaps these pieces will bolster the book’s argument for where to find inspiration and input in your own life, perhaps not. Either way, I hope they are illuminating.

I must admit, Krattenmaker’s NOTES section made the process of discovering “further reading” super easy. Most of what follows was pulled from those pages; I selected the ones I felt best broadened the scope of each chapter and linked them for you here…

First, listen to this —
On Being with Krista Tippett – The Equation of Change

For more on contemporary American Religion —
American Grace: How Religion Divides and Unites Us by Robert Putnam and David Campbell

For a deeper dive into exploring the modern world in theological terms —
The Powers That Be: Theology for a New Millennium by Walter Wink

I’d love to know, what do you think about the interpretation of modesty in this article? 
Yoga Pants and What the Bible Really Says about Modesty
and here’s another opinion piece the book makes reference to in Chapter 3 —
The Caligulan Thrill

To enter into a conversation with Jesus —
Let Me Ask You a Question: Conversations with Jesus by Matthew Croasmun

For more on questioning the meaning of life —
What Makes Life With Living? Take a Moment to Ask 

* QUICK INTERMISSION *
So much to read and take in, amirite? How about a little break in the action for some tunes! Click  HERE for my Confessions of a Secular Jesus Follower playlist on Spotify. 🙂

For a greater understanding of the “urban age” discussed in Chapter 6–
America’s Urban Future

Some further reading on who we lock up —
The Poor Get Prison: The Alarming Spread of the Criminalization of Poverty

The invisible and forgotten —
The Black Family in the Age of Mass Incarceration

For more on religion and politics —
God’s Name in Vain: The Wrongs and Rights of Religion in Politics by Stephen Carter
and an interview with Jonathan Haidt —
Defusing Political Conflicts

How to approach the resurrection as a nonbeliever —
Easter for Atheists

Some more secular inspiration —
All Things Shining: Reading the Western Classics to Find Meaning in a Secular Age by Hubert Dreyfus and Sean Dorrance Kelly

Ok, that should keep us all busy for a bit. Happy reading!
And, one more time,…here’s the link to the Confessions of a Secular Jesus Follower SPOTIFY PLAYLIST. Enjoy!

Stay tuned for Part 4! xoxo

How to Put New Language Skills into Practice

I talk about lifelong learning a lot, and that includes learning languages! A second or even third language can open your mind in so many ways, as well as open doors to all kinds of new possibilities. So if you’re learning a language, how do you practice, how do you immerse yourself in that language to keep your skills fresh?

I am so grateful to have kicked off my love of language learning at a super young age. One thing I’ve come to realize over the years, however, is that YOU GOTTA USE IT OR LOSE IT. Cracking open a book will only get you so far! (File the following under: advice I give so that I’ll feel inclined to  practice what I preach, but…)

Here are some ideas to help you get the most out of your language practice.

Practical application

Okay, so if you don’t have anyone to practice your chosen language with, things can get pretty lonely. But if you’re stuck for a language partner there’s no harm having a conversation with yourself once in a while! For instance, turn cooking dinner into a reminder of kitchen and food vocabulary, or practice all you remember about shopping when you’re looking for a new outfit. You might also want to look into apps like Babbel or Duolingo to help you in your solitary language practice.

Literature and media

Now this tip comes from a recent Facebook post shared by Language Trainers. Thinking about starting a new book or  binge-watching a TV show? Why not choose one in the language you are learning! Okay, so a book might be a little daunting the first time you try it, but imagine all the language you might pick up just by reading a single page of a novel? Alternatively, if that is too much, a TV series or film with or without subtitles is an amazing way to practice your language at the same time as doing something fun. Netflix anyone?

[Related: Great YouTube Channel for Practicing Spanish!]

Language exchanges

Okay, so the suggestions so far have been pretty solitary pursuits; what’s the point of learning a language if you have no one to speak it with? Look in your area for language exchanges, or check online if there are groups nearby for language practice. Your local library might be a great place to start; even if they don’t host any events they might know somewhere that does!

Embrace the internet

The world is literally your oyster. You can have a real time conversation with a person on the other side of the planet if you wanted to (time zones and sleep schedules permitting, of course). One thing you could consider is downloading an app like HelloTalk to chat with native speakers from all over the world. In the classroom conversations can feel forced–you’re paired off with a classmate, told to discuss a specific topic, limited by a sheet of vocabulary words. But in our connected world you can seek out folks with similar interests and chat about anything under the sun. Something that will feel a lot more like a growing friendship than a group assignment.

Plan a vacation

The most rewarding way to practice a language you’re learning is to use it in a country where the language is spoken. Organize your next break away somewhere to visit a city you’ve always dreamed of; can you already picture yourself ordering some exquisite dinner looking out over landmarks you’ve only ever seen online? Imagine looking up all the museums, bars, or whatever you want to visit in the language you’re learning, and being able to read their websites with ease? How incredible would that feel? Put your hard work to good use and see this big, beautiful world of ours!

What languages are you learning? I’m a lifelong learner of Spanish and, after quite a long break, I’m dusting off my German skillz. Do you have any tips for making the most of a language practice? Or, better yet, got any Spanish- or German-language tv shows or YouTube channels you think I should check out. I’m all ears below! xoxo

How to Make a Super Simple Pocket Letter for Your Pen Pal!

I LOVE pocket letters. I love making them, I love following #PocketLetter on Instagram, and I DEFINITELY love opening up my mailbox to find one inside.

I’ve posted some PL’s on the blog before, but today I thought I’d show you an easy way to dip your toes in the water of this particular paper-craftin’ phenomenon. This method is especially fun if you have a pen pal and want a little inspo on something new to send their way.

So, for a more in-depth tutorial, and links to buy the pocket sheets, check out this post. But a quick run-down on the basics —
* each sheet comes with 9 “pockets”
* use your stationary stash to decorate each pocket to your heart’s content
* throw in some goodies for the PL recipient
* give the whole thing a theme or don’t — this is YOUR creation

Let’s take a look at this super simple pocket letter I created for a pen pal —

When you’re just starting out, it can help to give each pocket a “role” to guide the decorations and goodies. These can include —
* TAGS
* TEA
* STICKERS
* LETTER
* EPHEMERA
*MAIL TAG
* HOLIDAY
* WASHI
* and more stickers! 😉

Following that formula, here’s a look at the goodies in the back…

If you’re sending to a pen pal, the most important components are your letter and mail tag. But isn’t it fun to include some other surprises?!

The best part about pocket letter creation is digging deep into your stash and sharing with a friend. Think about the kinds of things your pen pal likes, their favorite colors, what they might appreciate. (For example, I’m pretty sure those vintage V-day stickers and macaron page flags will be a hit with mine!)

You don’t have to go out and buy a bunch of supplies to deliver these mailbox treats either. I happen to be a bit of a washi and sticker collector. But if you’re not, use whatcha got on hand. Use up old wrapping paper, cut images out of a magazine, hand letter a sweet mantra. You get the picture!

Do you love sending and receiving snail mail? Tell me what you like to send in the comments below!

Book Club: Confessions of a Secular Jesus Follower Pt. 2

Let’s learn a bit more about the author of our first book club book, shall we? Tom Krattenmaker is a columnist for USA Today and the Director of Communications at Yale Divinity School.

His work primarily explores the discord, problems, and potential that arises from the intersection of religion and culture. Tom considers himself a secular progressive, and Confessions of a Secular Jesus Follower stemmed from his idea that crucial moral guidance and insight can be gleaned from the Jesus found on the pages of the New Testament.

Previous books include Onward Christian Athletes (2009), a critique of Christianity in sports, and The Evangelicals You Don’t Know (2013), about the “new evangelicals” in our post-Christian America.

Not only an author and journalist, Krattenmaker is also a speaker — at the American Humanist Association conference on multiple occasions, as well as countless other events and many universities. He’s won awards from organizations like the American Academy of Religion, Religion Newswriters Association, Ecumenical Ministries of Oregon, and the Muslim Educational Trust.

He currently calls New Haven, Connecticut home and you can follow him on Twitter HERE.

“On the mountains I’ve climbed, figuratively speaking, I’ve discovered, and then rediscovered again and again, the anchor that means the most to me, the anchor I find most worthy of my trust. It’s the ethic and the inspiration and, indeed, the way of an ancient figure with whom we are acquainted, but whose relevance to our lives and society might not be so readily apparent, and whose availability to us, if we are secular might come as a complete surprise.”

***

More with Tom Krattenmaker

Posts and articles —

Real men get help when it’s needed–as it so often is Recent blog post
Christmas is a Time to Celebrate Jesus’s Moral Insights USA Today column
White progressives shouldn’t be smug about racism … USA Today column
Don’t Domesticate MLK Commentary in Religion News Service

Interviews —

Can You Be Secular and Still Love Jesus? An interview in Psychology Today
Reading is FUNdamental An interview on The Brain Candy Podcast
Do Religion and Pro Sports Mix? Faith Matters series on NPR

📚📚📚

Got any thoughts? Leave ’em below! And if you want exclusive book club content (incl. the full reading list and FREE printables) sent straight to your inbox — SIGN UP HERE. Part 3, coming soon!